When it was Dark: The Story of a Great Conspiracy

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1904 - 391 pages
 

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Page 118 - DOST thou, in the Name of this child, renounce the devil and all his works, the vain pomp and glory of the world, with all covetous desires of the same, and the carnal desires of the flesh, so that thou wilt not follow, nor be led by them?
Page 203 - Religion agreed upon by the archbishops and bishops of both provinces and the whole clergy in the convocation holden at London in the year of our Lord God...
Page 4 - LIGHTEN our darkness, we beseech thee, O Lord ; and by thy great mercy defend us from all perils and dangers of this night ; for the love of thy only Son, our Saviour, Jesus Christ.
Page 294 - ... side-posts of our doors, that he may spare and pass on ; he takes his victims from the castle of the noble, the mansion of the wealthy and the cottage of the poor and the lowly, and it is on behalf of all these classes that I make this solemn appeal.
Page 201 - Wherefore henceforth know we no man after the flesh ; yea though we have known Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we him no more.
Page 291 - God is most great ! I testify that there is no god but God ! I testify that there is no god but God...
Page 283 - All ye inhabitants of the world, and dwellers on the earth, see ye, when he lifteth up an ensign on the mountains ; and when he bloweth a trumpet, hear ye.
Page 28 - Prune thou thy words, the thoughts control, That o'er thee swell and throng; They will condense within thy soul, And change to purpose strong. " But he who lets his feelings run In soft, luxurious flow, Shrinks when hard service must be done, And faints at every woe. " Faith's meanest deed more favour bears, Where hearts and wills are weighed, Than brightest transports, choicest prayers, Which bloom their hour and fade.
Page 139 - ... therefore to the two minor, but still not inconsiderable, defects I have named, Parliament conforms itself accurately enough, both as a chooser of executives and as a legislature, to the formed opinion of the country. Similarly, and subject to the same exceptions, it expresses the nation's opinion in words well, when it happens that words, not laws, are wanted. On foreign matters, where we cannot legislate, whatever the English nation thinks, or thinks it thinks, as to the critical events of...
Page 212 - Who have said, With our tongue will we prevail; our lips are our own: who is lord over us?

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