The Treasury of Botany: A Popular Dictionary of the Vegetable Kingdom with which is Incorporated a Glossary of Botanical Terms

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, 1866
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Contents

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 239 - Kat and Cafta do not impair the health or impede the observance of religious duties, but only increase hilarity and good- humour, it was lawful to use them, as also the drink made from the boon or coffee-berry.
Page 234 - The Chestnut is, next the Oak, one of the most sought after by the carpenter and joiner. It hath formerly built a good part of our ancient houses in the City of London...
Page 435 - A rich butter-like custard highly flavoured with almonds gives the best general idea of it, but intermingled with it come wafts of flavour that call to mind cream-cheese, onion-sauce, brown sherry, and other incongruities. Then there is a rich glutinous smoothness in the pulp which nothing else possesses, but which adds to its delicacy. It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy, yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, for it is perfect as it is.
Page xii - Banjoowangee for cultivation, it is with much difficulty the inhabitants can be made to approach the tree, as they dread the cutaneous eruption which it is known to produce when newly cut down. But except when the tree is largely wounded, or when it is felled, by which a large portion of the juice is disengaged, the effluvia of which mixing with the atmosphere, affects the persons exposed to it with the symptoms just mentioned, the tree may be approached and ascended like the other common trees in...
Page 435 - ... brown sherry, and other incongruities. Then there is a rich glutinous smoothness in the pulp, which nothing else possesses, but which adds to its delicacy. It is neither acid, nor sweet, nor juicy, yet one feels the want of none of these qualities, for it is perfect as it is. It produces no nausea or other bad effect, and the more you eat of it the less you feel inclined to stop. In fact, to eat durions is a new sensation worth a voyage to the East to experience.
Page 60 - Standing by his Majesty at dinner in the presence, there was of that rare fruit called the King-pine, growing in Barbadoes and the West Indies ; the first of them I had ever...
Page 230 - Cloves (C. aromaticus) is a handsome evergreen, rising to from fifteen to thirty feet, with large elliptic leaves and purplish flowers arranged in corymbs on short-jointed stalks. The Cloves of commerce are the unexpanded flower-buds, and derive their name from the French word clou, a nail, in allusion to the shape of the bud with its long calyx tube, and the round knob or head of petals at the top. These buds are collected by hand, or by beating the tree with sticks, when the buds, from the jointed...
Page 218 - Later in the season it .... displays its numerous clusters of trumpet-shaped cream-colored flowers [the ' bugle bloom ' of Keats] tinged with crimson, and shedding a perfume which, in sweetness, is surpassed by no other British plant. .... In October, the woodbine endeavors to impart a grace to the fading year by producing a new crop of flowers, which, though not so luxuriant nor so numerous as the first, are quite as fragrant. Clusters of flowers and of ripe berries may then be found on the same...
Page 292 - Gallesio, oranges were brought by the Arabs from India by two routes — the sweet ones through Persia to Syria, and thence to the shores of Italy and the south of France ; and the bitter, called in commerce Seville oranges, by way of Arabia, Egypt, and the North of Africa to Spain.
Page 252 - that in less than twenty-six years after, other lands had cherries, even as far as Britain beyond the Ocean.

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