The history of the Arabians, under the government of the Caliphs: from Mahomet, their founder, to the death of Mostazem, the fifty-sixth and last Abassian Caliph; containing the space of six hundred thirty six years, Volume 3

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T. Payne, 1758 - History
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Page 75 - God doth no wrong to man, in withdrawing the favours he hath in a plenteous manner bestowed on him. He owed him nothing; he hath gratified him therewith, according to his appointed time; it is now his pleasure to confer them on others ; it is our duty to submit to his will. The wise man ought not to covet riches, but he may receive them, in order to employ them for the good of the state, and should enjoy the residue only as a traveller enjoys his rest for a night at...
Page 76 - To some of his friends who came to' condole with him in his prison, he said, " Power and riches are only loans, which fortune trusts to man ; we must be contented with the use of them for a season. She hath chosen us for an example to such as shall come after us, that they may learn not to be proud...
Page 323 - The imperial palace was adorned with the richeft furniture ; arms of all kinds were placed in view ; all -the Caliph's guard was drawn up in the great fquare to the number of fifty thoufand men, to whom they publickly gave their pay in purfes of gold. In another place appeared four thoufand white eunuchs, and three thoufand black eunuchs, with feven hundred ufhers to guard the gates and avenues to the palace.
Page 92 - Gauge in his annals fays, that the clock, which was of brafs, (hewed the hours by the fall of balls of metal on the Bell, and by the figures of knights, which opened and ftmt doors according to the number of hours.
Page 76 - It is perhaps," answered Yiah, " the voice of some distressed person, who hath cried aloud to heaven for vengeance against us : perhaps we have unwittingly neglected to administer justice to some person under oppression ; if the crime is involuntary, the Divine mercy will pardon us. Perhaps it is an effect of God's goodness, to shew us the instability of the...
Page 80 - Caliph againft an iU luftrious family, which had been fo unjuftly profcribed, fell at his feet to return him thanks : when he arofe in order to depart, he was amazed to fee the Caliph make him a prefent : it was a golden plate. Mondir, when he received it, gave a...
Page 74 - Arabian author reIttes, that the princefs was only banifhed, and reduced to a moft miferable condition. He tells us, that a lady of her acquaintance having met her in the place of her exile, had a converfation with her, in which Abaflah calling to mind her former grandeur, informed the lady...
Page 75 - Power and riches" faid he to them, " are . .^ no more than loans, which fortune trufts to man ; we muft be contented with the ufe of them for a feafon. She hath chofen us for an example to fuch as...
Page 27 - Almanzor, related the converfation that had pafled between him and the hermit. The Caliph had no fooner heard the word Moclas, than he alighted from his horfe, fell proftrate on the ground, and returned thanks to God that he had chofen him as an inftrument to execute his will.
Page 79 - They have fhewn themfelves to be faithful fubjects, the fupport of your throne, and beneficent to all fuch as were indigent or opprefled : how then can we forget their benefits, their virtues, their fervices ? You may filence the bafe and the ungrateful ; but your power does not...

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