A General Account of the Calamities Occasioned by the Late Tremendous Hurricanes and Earthquakes in the West-India Islands, Foreign as Well as Domestic: ... Also a List of the Committee Appointed to Manage the Subscriptions ... Carefully Collated from Authentic Papers, by Mr. Fowler

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J. Stockdale, and W. Richardson, 1781 - 86 pages
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Page 35 - In vain was it to look round for shelter : houses that, from their situation, it was to have been imagined would have been in a degree protected, were all flat with the earth ; and the miserable owners, if they were so fortunate as to escape with their lives, were left without a covering for themselves and family.
Page 34 - NNW, and the tempest increasing every minute, the family took to the centre of the building ; imagining, from the prodigious strength of the walls, they being three feet thick, and from its circular form, it would have withstood the wind's utmost rage ; however, by half...
Page 34 - To continue in the cellar was impossible ; to return to the house equally so : the only chance left was making for the fields, which at that time appeared equally dangerous; it was, however, attempted, and the family...
Page 33 - By ten o'clock it increased very much ; by one the ships in the bay drove ; by four o'clock the Albemarle frigate...
Page 49 - The storm continued with incredible vehemence during the whole day; but the weather, about midnight, became more moderate, and by the next morning the wind was totally abated. The direction of the hurricane was from NNE to ESE, and it lasted twenty-nine hours.
Page 34 - It was, however, attempted; and the family got to the ruins of the foundation of the flagstaff, which soon after giving way, every one endeavoured to find a retreat for himself. The Governor and the few that remained were thrown down; and it was with great difficulty they gained the cannon, under the carriage of which they took shelter.
Page 27 - ... and became a perfect tempest, which lasted in force until near eight; it then abated. The sea during the last period exhibited a most awful scene; the waves swelled to an amazing height, rushed with an impetuosity not to be described on the land, and in a few minutes determined the fate of all the houses in the Bay.
Page 53 - Laurel was driven on fhore, and very foon went to pieces. The Marquis de Bouille could not confider men who had only the force of the elements to cope with, in the light of enemies ; but that having, in common with themfelves, partaken of the danger, were in like manner entitled to every comfort and relief that could be given in a time of fuch univerfal calamity and diftrefs. He laments only that their number was fo few, and that among them no officer was faved.
Page 30 - Lordship the miseries of the inhabitants; on the one hand, the ground covered with the mangled bodies of their friends and relations, and on the other, reputable families, wandering through the ruins, seeking for food and shelter; in short, imagination can form but a faint idea of the horrors of this dreadful scene.
Page 34 - ... of the building, imagining, from the prodigious strength of the walls, they being three feet thick, and from its circular form, it would have withstood the wind's utmost rage; however, by half past 11 they were obliged to retreat to the cellar, the wind having forced its passage into every part and tore off most of the. roof.

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