Romance of Russia, from Rurik to Bolshevik

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G. P. Putnam's sons, 1921 - Legends - 352 pages
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Page 228 - Which he must go to, If the Pope say true, If he does not in time look about him; Where his namesake almost He may have for his Host...
Page 226 - On a summer excursion to Moscow: The fields were green, and the sky was blue, Morbleu! Parbleu! What a pleasant excursion to Moscow! Four hundred thousand men and more Must go with him to Moscow: There were marshals by the dozen, And dukes by the score; Princes a few, and kings one or two. While the fields are so green, and the sky so blue, Morbleu! Parbleu! What a pleasant excursion to Moscow!
Page 227 - A name which you all know by sight very well ; But which no one can speak, and no one can spell. They stuck close to Nap with all their might, They were on the left and on the right, Behind and before, and by day and by night ; He would rather parlez-vous than fight ; But he look'd white and he look'd blue, Morbleu ! Parbleu ! When parlez-vous no more would do, For they remembered Moscow.
Page 227 - But the fields were green, and the sky was blue, Morbleu ! Parbleu ! And so he got to Moscow. 7. He found the place too warm for him, For they set fire to Moscow. To get there had cost him much ado ; And then no better course he knew, While the fields were green, and the sky was blue, Morbleu ! Parbleu ! But to march back again from Moscow.
Page 226 - And Counsellor Brougham was all in a fume At the thought of the march to Moscow : The Russians, he said, they were undone, And the great Fee-Faw-Fum Would presently come, With a hop, step, and jump, unto London...
Page 228 - What then thought the Emperor Nap Upon the road from Moscow? Why, I ween he thought it small delight To fight all day, and to freeze all night; And he was besides in a very great fright, For a whole skin he liked to be in; And so, not knowing what else to do, When the fields were so white, and the sky so blue, Morbleu! Parbleu! He stole away — I tell you true — Upon the road from Moscow. "'Tis myself," quoth he, "I must mind most; So the Devil may take the hindmost.
Page 228 - Europe crouched under his rod, Put his trust in his Fortune, and not in his God. Worse and worse every day the elements grew, The fields were so white, and the sky so blue, Sacrebleu ! Ventrebleu ! What a horrible journey from Moscow I 10. What then thought the Emperor Nap Upon the road from Moscow...
Page 228 - He has reckoned too long without him. If that Host get him in Purgatory, He won't leave him there alone with his glory ; But there he must stay for a very long day, For from thence there is no stealing away, As there was on the road from Moscow.
Page 350 - The pillars themselves are embellished with figures arranged in zones as in the Egyptian temples and palaces. Nothing could be more strange than this decoration where thousands of figures surround you like a mute assemblage, ascending and descending the entire length of the walls, walking in files in Christian panathenaea, standing alone in poses of hieratic rigidity, bending over to the pendentives, and draping the temple with a human tapestry swarming with motionless beings. A strange light, carefully...
Page 304 - He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought. And as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! One, two! One, two! And through and through The vorpal blade went snicker-snack! He left it dead, and with its head He went galumphing back. And hast thou slain the Jabberwock? Come to my arms, my beamish boy! O frabjous day! Callooh!...

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