Favorite Fairy Tales

Front Cover
Belford, Clarke, 1884 - 138 pages
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Contents

I
7
II
20
III
35
IV
43
V
55
VI
72
VII
92
VIII
100
IX
110
X
129

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Page 92 - ONCE upon a time there were Three Bears, who lived together in a house of their own, in a wood. One of them was a Little, Small, Wee Bear; and one was a Middle-sized Bear, and the other was a Great, Huge Bear.
Page 114 - It was about seven o'clock in the morning when we set out on this important business, and the first house we came to was Farmer Wilson's. Here Margery stopped, and ran up to the door, tap, tap, tap. "Who's there?" "Only little Goody Twoshoes," answered Margery,
Page 96 - Now the little old woman had left the spoon of the Great, Huge Bear standing in his porridge. 'SOMEBODY HAS BEEN AT MY PORRIDGE ! ' said the Great, Huge Bear, in his great, gruff voice.
Page 80 - ... and asked them what they would send out. They all had something that they were willing to venture except poor Dick, who had neither money nor goods, and therefore could send nothing.
Page 49 - ... his person, which was very comely, to the greatest advantage, the king's daughter was mightily taken with his appearance ; and the marquis of Carabas had no sooner cast upon her two or three respectful glances, than she became violently in love with him. The king insisted on his getting into the carriage, and taking a ride with them. The cat, enchanted to see how well his scheme was likely to succeed, ran before to a meadow that was...
Page 81 - Dick could not bear this usage any longer, and he thought he would run away from his place; so he packed up his few things, and started very early in the morning, on Allhallows Day, which is the first of November.
Page 110 - Margery's poor mother survived the loss of her husband but a few days, and died of a broken heart, leaving Margery and her little brother to the wide world ; but, poor woman, it would have melted your heart to have seen how frequently she heaved up her head, while she lay speechless, to survey with languishing looks her little orphans, as much as to say, " Do Tommy, do Margery, come with me.
Page 95 - So first she tasted the porridge of the Great, Huge Bear, and that was too hot for her. And then she tasted the porridge of the Middle Bear, and that was too cold for her. And then she went to the porridge of the Little, Small, Wee Bear, and tasted that; and that was neither too hot nor too cold, but just right; and she liked it so well, that she ate it all up. Then little Silver-hair sate down in the chair of the Great, Huge Bear, and that was too hard for her.
Page 122 - early to bed and early to rise, is the way to be healthy, wealthy, and wise.
Page 122 - Some time after this a poor lamb had lost its dam, and the farmer being about to kill it, she bought it of him, and brought it home with her to play with the children, and teach them when to go to bed, for it was a rule with the wise men of that age (and a very good one, let me tell you) to " Rise with the lark, and lie down with the lamb.

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