Pagans in the Promised Land: Decoding the Doctrine of Christian Discovery

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Fulcrum Publishing, 2008 - Law - 186 pages
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Pagans in the Promised Land provides a unique, well-researched challenge to U.S. federal Indian law and policy. It attacks the presumption that American Indian nations are legitimately subject to the plenary power of the United States. Steve Newcomb puts forth a startling theory that U.S. federal Indian law and policy are premised on Old Testament narratives of the chosen people and the promised land, as exemplified in the 1823 Supreme Court ruling Johnson v. McIntosh, that the first "Christian people" to "discover" lands inhabited by "natives, who were heathens," have an ultimate title to and dominion over these lands and peoples. This imporant addition to legal scholarship asserts there is no separation of church and state in the United States, so long as U.S. federal Indian law and policy are premised on the ancient religious distinctions between "Christians" and "heathens."
 

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Contents

A Primer on Cognitive Theory
1
Metaphorical Experience and Federal Indian Law
13
The Conqueror Model
23
Colonizing the Promised Land
37
The Chosen PeoplePromised Land Model
51
The Dominating Mentality of Christendom
59
Johnson v MIntosh
73
Converting Christian Discovery into Heathen Conquest
89
The Mental Process of Negation
103
Christian Nations Theory Hidden in Plain Sight
115
A Sacred Regard for All Living Things
125
Notes
139
References
171
Index
181
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Steven T. Newcomb (Shawnee/Lenape) is the indigenous law research coordinator at the Sycuan education department of the Sycuan Band of the Kumeyaay Nation in San Diego County, California. He is cofounder and codirector of the Indigenous Law Institute, a fellow with the American Indian Policy and Media Initiative at Buffalo State College in New York.

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