The Fragmented Metropolis: Los Angeles, 1850-1930

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University of California Press, Jun 9, 1993 - History - 362 pages
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Here with a new preface, a new foreword, and an updated bibliography is the definitive history of Los Angeles from its beginnings as an agricultural village of fewer than 2,000 people to its emergence as a metropolis of more than 2 million in 1930—a city whose distinctive structure, character, and culture foreshadowed much of the development of urban America after World War II.
 

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User Review  - Cygnus555 - LibraryThing

Very interesting book for those who have never realized that Los Angeles actually has a history. It opened my eyes to a number of details that I am glad I now know... what happened to the electric ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
From Pueblo to Town
5
Private Enterprise Public Authority and Urban Expansion
24
The Rivalry between Los Angeles and San Diego
43
The Great Migration
63
Transportation Water and Real Estate
85
Commercial and Industrial Progress
108
The Fragmented Metropolis
137
The Quest for Community
186
The Politics of Progressivism
205
The Municipal Ownership Movement
229
City and Regional Planning
247
The Simple Life
273
Bibliography
279
Notes
297
Index
349

The Failure of the Electric Railways
164

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About the author (1993)

Robert M. Fogelson is Professor of Urban Studies and History at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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