Scientific dialogues, with corrections by O. Gregory

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Contents

Of the Attraction of Gravitation
18
Of the Centre of Gravity
21
Of the Centre of Gravity
23
On the Laws of Motion
25
On the Laws of Motion
30
On the Laws of Motion
32
On the Mechanical Powers
35
Of the Lever
38
Of the Lever 41
41
Of the Wheel and Axle
44
Of the Pulley 47
47
Of the Inclined Plane
50
Of the Wedge
52
Of the Screw
54
Of the Pendulum
58
Of the Fixed Stars II Of the Fixed Stars
60
Of the Fixed Stars and Ecliptic
64
Of the Ephemeris
67
Of the Solar System
71
Of the Figure of the Earth
74
Of the Diurnal Motion of the Earth VIII Of Day and Night IX Of the Annual Motion of the Earth x Of the Seasons 60 62 64 67 71 74
78
Of the Seasons
86
Of Leapyear and the Old and New Styles
96
Of the Moon 92 96
98
Of Eclipses
102
Of the Tides
105
Of the Harvest Moon
109
Of Mercury
112
Of Venus
113
Of Mars
116
Of Jupiter
118
Of Saturn XXIII Of Herschel XXIV Of Comets xxv Of the Sun XXVI Of the Fixed Stars 102
120
Introduction
131
Of the Weight and Pressure of Fluids III Of the Weight and Pressure of Fluids
135
Of the Lateral Pressure of Fluids
142
Of the Hydrostatic Paradox
144
Of the Hydrostatic Bellows
147
Of the Pressure of Fluids against the Sides of Vessels
150
Of the Motion of Fluids IX Of the Motion of Fluids x Of the Specific Gravities of Bodies XI Of the Specific Gravities of Bodies
152
Of the Methods of finding the Specific Gravity of Bodies
163
Of the Methods of finding the Specific Gravities of Bodies
166
Of the Methods of obtaining the Specific Gravity of Bodies
169
Of the Method of obtaining the Specific Gravity of Bodies
171
Of the Hydrometer
174
Of the Hydrometer and Swimming
177
Of the Syphon
180
Of the Diving Bell xx Of the Diving Bell XXI Of Pumps
184
Of the ForcingPump FireEngine RopePump Chain Pump and Hydraulic Press
191
Of the Nature of
195
Of the AirPump
197
Of the Torricellian Experiment
201
Of the Pressure of the Air v Of the Pressure of the
203
Of the Weight of
209
Of the SteamEngine XVII Of the SteamEngine
240
Of the SteamEngine and Papins Digester
246
135
261
Of the Pyrometer and Hygrometer
262
APPENDIX TO PNEUMATICS
269
Of the Refraction of Light
277
Definitionsof the different kinds of Lensesof
283
Of the Nature and Advantages of Lightof the separa
290
Of Concave Mirrorstheir useshow they
298
Of Convex Reflectionof Optical Delusionsof Anamor
304
Conversation Page XVI Of the Eye and Manner of Vision
309
Of Spectacles and of their uses
312
Of the Rainbow
314
Of the Refracting Telescope
318
Of Reflecting Telescopes
322
Of the Microscopeits Principleof the Single Micro scope of the Compound Microscopeof the Solar Microscope
325
Of the Camera Obscura Magic Lantern and Multiplying Glass c
330
On Double Refraction and Polarization of Light
334
Of the MagnetIts PropertiesUseful to Mariners and othersIron rendered MagneticProperties of the Magnet
340
Magnetic Attraction and Repulsion
341
The Method of making MagnetsOf the Mariners Compass
344
Of the Variation of the Compass
347
On Diamagnetics and the Magnetization of Light
350
The Early History of Electricity
352
Of Electric Attraction and RepulsionOf Electrics and Conductors
354
Of the Electrical Machine
357
Of the Electrical Machine
359
Of Electrical Attraction and Repulsion
362
Of Electrical Attraction and Repulsion
366
Of the Leyden Phial or Jar
368
Of the Leyden JarLanes Discharging Electrometer and the Electrical Battery
372
Experiments made with the Electrical Battery
374
Of the Electric Spark and Miscellaneous Experiments
378
Conversation Page XI Miscellaneous ExperimentsOf the EletrophorusOf the Electrometer and the Thunder House
381
On Induction
383
Of Atmospherical Electricity
385
On Atmospheric ElectricityOf the Aurora Borealis Of Waterspouts and Whirlwinds
388
Medical Electricity
393
XVI Of Animal Electricity of the Torpedo of the Gymnotus Electricus and of the Silurus Electricus
396
General Summary of Electricity with Experiments
398
VOLTAIC ELECTRICITY 1 Of Galvanismits OriginExperimentsOf the Decom position of Water
402
Galvanic Light and ShocksVoltaism
404
Voltaic ConductorsCirclesTablesExperiments
407
Miscellaneous Experiments
414
On ElectroMagnetism
418
MagnetoElectricityThermoElectricity
422
221
425
224
426
230
428
138
429
117
430
246
434

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Popular passages

Page 298 - ... as the angle of reflection is always equal to the angle of incidence, the image for any point can be seen only in the reflected ray prolonged.
Page 268 - ... 1. The rising of the mercury presages, in general, fair weather, and its falling foul weather, as rain, snow, high winds, and storms.
Page 113 - Annual for me, the grape, the rose renew The juice nectareous, and the balmy dew; For me, the mine a thousand treasures brings; For me, health gushes from a thousand springs; Seas roll to waft me, suns to light me rise; My foot-stool earth, my canopy the skies.
Page 97 - This alteration took place through the greater part of Europe, and the year was afterwards called the Gregorian year, or New Style. In this country, the method of reckoning, according to the New Style, was not admitted into our calendars until the year 1752, when the error amounted to nearly 11 days, which were taken from the month of September, by calling the 3d of that month the 14th.
Page 99 - Shedding sweet influence. Less bright the moon, But opposite in levell'd west was set His mirror, with full face borrowing her light From him, for other light she needed none In that aspect, and still that distance keeps Till night ; then in the east her turn she shines...
Page 106 - The attraction of the sun and moon upon the waters of the ocean. The moon being nearest to the earth, her attraction is six times greater than that of the sun. This attraction of the moon raises the waters of the ocean as they come under her influence by the motion of the earth on its axis.
Page 260 - ... will slide on towards the narrow end, less or more, according to the degree of heat to which it has been exposed*. Each degree of Mr. Wedgewood's thermometer answers to 130 degrees of Fahrenheit, and he begins his scale from red heat fully visible in daylight, which he finds to be equal to 1077 of Fahrenheit's scale, if it could be carried so high.
Page 284 - A lens is glass ground into such a form, as to collect or disperse the rays of light which pass through it. These are of different shapes, and from thence receive different names.
Page 300 - When the object is more remote from the mirror than its centre of concavity C, the image will be less than the object, and between the object and...
Page 43 - ... to his strength; which is done by so dividing the beam they pull, that the point of traction may be as much nearer to the stronger horse than to the weaker, as the strength of the former exceeds that of the latter. To this kind of lever may be reduced...

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