Johann Sebastian Bach: The Story of the Development of a Great Personality

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G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1909 - Composers - 584 pages
 

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Page 314 - Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by? Behold and see, if there is any sorrow like unto my sorrow".
Page 134 - E major concerto might even be compared with the "dialogues" in the cantatas, or perhaps even more aptly with the slow movement of Beethoven's Concerto in G. The great fascination which such movements exercise over people who are not essentially musical (as well as over those who are musical as well as poetical) lies in the fact that the form is psychological rather than essentially musical. The form is of the spirit rather than the letter. Bach spent a great part of his life feeling his way in this...
Page 307 - ... befits your Majesty's world-famed clemency, and condescend to take me under your Majesty's most mighty protection. For some years, and up to the present time, I have had the direction of the music in the two principal churches in Leipzig; but I have had to suffer, though in all innocence, from one...
Page 145 - Das wohl temperirte Clavier oder Praeludia und Fugen durch alle Tone und Semitonia, Sowohl tertiam majorem oder Ut Re Mi anlangend, als auch tertiam minorem oder Re Mi Fa betreffend — Zum Nutzen und Gebrauch der Lehr-Begierigen Musicalischen Jugend, als auch derer in diesem Studio schon habil seyenden, Besonderem Zeitvertreib aufgesetzet und verfertiget von Johann Sebastian Bach pt Hochf.
Page 134 - But in both the present instances Bach's cue is definite and special, and gives the scheme a distinct character of its own. What was most probably in his mind was to make the subject which is given to the basses a kind of text or psychological entity which recurred persistently in the manner of what the French call happily an 'obsession...
Page 468 - The prelude," wrote Sir CHH Parry (Johann Sebastian Bach, London, 1909), "is indeed massive and dignified, but unusually harmonic and melodious in style, and the details of the texture are by no means so characteristic as is usual in Bach's organ works. It was certainly written under Italian influences and contains many traces of the Italian concerto type in passages which suggest alternations of tutti and soli. The Fugue is certainly one of the most perfect and finished }f Bach's works of the kind.
Page 307 - ... protection. For some years, and up to the present time, I have had the direction of the music in the two principal churches in Leipzig; but I have had to suffer, though in all innocence, from one and another vexatious cause — at different times a diminution of the fees connected with this function, and which might be withheld altogether unless your Kingly Majesty will show me grace and confer upon me a...
Page 440 - Jerusalem, and see now, and know, and seek in the broad places thereof, if ye can find a man, if there be any that doeth justly, that seeketh truth ; and I will pardon her. And though they say, As the LORD liveth ; surely they swear falsely.
Page 175 - They are generally spoken of as suites, but the name overture, which Bach seems to have given them, gains in this case no little importance through what it implies. There can be no doubt, indeed, that Bach was experimenting in these works in the most extended form of the French overture. This overture comprised several movements, the most prominent of which are the massive opening slow movement, and the movement of fugal or Vanzona...
Page 144 - O wie vergnügt wär so mein Ende: Es drückten deine schönen Hände Mir die getreuen Augen zu. Bist du bei mir, geh ich mit Freuden Zum Sterben und zu meiner Ruh.

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