Research Methods for Community Change: A Project-Based Approach

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SAGE, Feb 15, 2005 - Social Science - 271 pages
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Everyone is a member of a community, and every community is continually changing. To successfully manage that change, community members need information. Research Methods for Community Change is an in-depth review of all of the research methods that communities use to solve problems, develop their resources and protect their identities.

With an engaging, friendly style and numerous real world examples, author Randy Stoecker shows readers how to use a project-based research model in the community. The four features of the model are:

· Diagnosing a community condition

· Prescribing an intervention for the condition

· Implementing the prescription

· Evaluating its impact.

At every stage of this model there are research tasks, from needs and assets assessments at the diagnosis stage to process and outcome studies at the evaluation stage. Readers will also learn the importance of involving community members at every stage of the project and in every aspect of the research, making the research part of the community-building process.

 

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Contents

But I Dont Do Research
1
So What Is Research?
4
Okay So I Do Research Already Why Do I Need to Learn About It?
9
Im Already Running FullOut Managing Our Programs How Can I Do More Research too?
11
Im Still Not Convinced But Just In case Where Do I Start?
13
So Where Do I and My Community Fit In?
20
Conclusion and Coming Attractions
22
The Goose Story
24
Prescribing Researching Options
115
Services and Policies
117
A Planning Approach
119
The Special Case of Policy Prescriptions
130
Loose Gravel
138
Conclusion
142
Resources
143
Notes
144

Notes
25
The Goose Approach to Research
27
Participatory Approach to ProjectBased Research
30
A Participatory Approach to ProjectBased Research
35
The Researcher Side
39
The Community Side
42
Loose Gravel
45
Conclusion
54
Resources
55
Notes
57
Head and Hand Together A ProjectBased Research Model
59
From Head to Hand to Research and Action
61
Of Programs and Projects
64
diagnose Prescribe Implement Evaluate
66
The Project Model and Participatory Flexibility
73
Where Are You In the Project Cycle?
75
Loose Gravel
77
Conclusion
83
Resources
84
Diagnosing
87
The Impetus for Diagnosis
89
The Core Group
91
Problems and Opportunities
95
Needs Assessment
96
Asset Mapping
102
Of Needs and Resources
105
Loose Gravel
107
Conclusion
110
Resources
111
Notes
112
Implementing When Research Is the Project
147
Research as Action
149
Community Research
152
Target Research
162
Loose Gravel
171
Conclusion
174
Resources
175
Notes
176
Evaluation
181
Choices in Evaluation
184
Participatory Evaluation From the Beginning
193
Participatory Evaluation as an Integrated Process
198
Loose Gravel
202
Conclusion
205
Resources
206
Notes
207
Beyond Information Research as an Organizational Lifestyle
211
The ProjectBased Research Cycle Revisited
215
Role Models for Research as a Daily Practice
219
Information Management and Information Technology
221
Information Myths and Monsters
227
In Conclusion
231
Notes
232
Strategic Planning
235
Research Ethics
241
Writing Proposals
249
Data Resources
257
Index
259
About the Author
271
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Randy Stoecker is a Professor of Community and Environmental Sociology at the University of Wisconsin, with a joint appointment at the University of Wisconsin Extension Center for Community and Economic Development. He is the moderator/editor of COMM-ORG: The On-Line Conference on Community Organizing and Development (http://comm-org.wisc.edu). His areas of expertise include community organizing and development, participatory action research/evaluation, and community information technology. He has been involved in a wide variety of community-based participatory research projects and participatory evaluations with community development corporations, community organizing groups, and community information technology programs across North America and Australia. He also helped build and evaluate university-community collaborations through the Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation’s Learn and Serve America Community Research Project. Randy trains, speaks and writes extensively on community organizing and development, community-based participatory research, service learning, and community information technology. He is author of Defending Community (1994) co-author of Community-Based Research and Higher Education (2003), and co-editor of The Unheard Voices: Community Organizations and Service Learning (2009). You can find his complete curriculum vitae at http://comm-org.wisc.edu/stoeckerfolio/stoeckvita.htm. He resides in Madison, Wisconsin with his wife and 50-pound standard poodle (his daughter is now away at college), and wishes he lived in a society where research has become such an integral part of the culture that people are no longer fooled into making self-destructive political choices.

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