Hand-book of the Economic Products of the Punjab: With a Combined Index and Glossary of Technical Vernacular Words, Part 15, Volume 2

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Printed at the Thomason Civil Engineering College Press, 1872 - Decorative arts
 

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Page iii - in a country like this we must not expect to find anything that appeals to mind or deep feeling'? Zetland, in "The Legacy of India," laments that after a hundred and fifty years of British rule in India 'it comes as something of a shock to discover how little has been added during that time to the legacy of India in the (cultural) sense in which the word is here employed.
Page 36 - Phiri, or seconds- wool, is extricated. Though too coarse for fine shawls, it is used in the manufacture of those of inferior quality, and of a strong shawl-cloth called Patu. The tumbu is then worked out into a thin flat roving, about half a yard long, which is called a Mala. The mala is folded up to the size of the tumbu, and deposited in a deep pot of red earthenware, called a Taskas, to be out of the way of dust or accident, till required for the spinning-wheel.
Page 37 - ... per pao, according to the fineness of the yarn ; and the spinning of this quantity into yarn suited for shawls will occupy a woman for eight days. There are several varieties of thread, distinguished by different degrees of fineness. From one pal of clean fine shawlwool a spinner will draw from a hundred to a thousand threads of three and a half gaz each. There is not such a difference between the price of coarse and of fine yarn as might be expected, owing to the greater expenditure on the former...
Page 40 - Chautahi. 150 to 400 ditto. Shash Mantahi. 250 to 200 ditto. Feringi. 100 to 500 ditto. Exported chiefly to Russia. Tara Armeni. 100 to 250 ditto. Ditto to Armenia and Persia. Tara Rumi. 120 to 300 ditto. Ditto to Turkey. Sada. 12 to 15 ditto, for domestic use. Shamlas, or girdles for the waist, worn by the Asiatics, are eight gaz in length, and one and a half gaz broad, and of various colours and patterns, and vary from 50 to 2000 rupees a-piece, according to the richness of the work. Doshala, or...
Page 350 - When sated with the martial show That peopled all the plain below, The wandering eye could o'er it go, And mark the distant city glow With gloomy splendour red ; For on the smoke-wreaths, huge and slow, That round her sable turrets flow, The morning beams were shed, And tinged them with a lustre proud, Like that which streaks a thunder-cloud. Such dusky grandeur clothed the height, Where the huge Castle holds its state, And all the steep slope...
Page 178 - ... and paved with large square stones. The front corridor is seven feet wide. The separating wall is very massive, and has three doors, a large one in the centre, and a smaller one on each side. In this corridor, on each side of the principal door, is a large tablet of hieroglyphics, each thirteen feet long and eight feet high, and each divided into two hundred and forty squares of characters or symbols.
Page 108 - The upper classes cover this sheep-skin cloak either with brocade or with silk. Their heads are always bare, the hair being arranged in a border of narrow plaits, which hang round the head like a long fringe. From the forehead, over the division...
Page 39 - ... described, and the worked shawl (doshali amli), in which the whole of the embroidery is worked on the cloth, with needles having eyes, and with a particular kind of woollen thread, instead of the silk employed in the usual embroidered work. In the amli shawl the pattern, which is in every case delineated, but which at the loom is read off in certain technical terms from a book, is covered with transparent paper, upon which the outlines of the composition are slightly traced with a charcoal twig,...
Page 37 - That intended for the former is double, and is cut into lengths of three gaz and a half, anything short of that measure being considered fraudulent. The number of these lengths varies from two thousand to three thousand, according to the closeness or openness of texture proposed, and the fineness or coarseness of the yarn. The weft is made of yarn which is single, but a little thicker than the double yarn or twist of the warp. The weight of the weft is estimated at a half more than that of the warp.
Page 260 - ... effected : when each of the three parts that are to form the whole is completed in itself, the sides are carried to the bottom of the boat, and at once secured by crooked pieces of timber to the flat future bottom of the doondah. To bring the bow and stern up to the corresponding parts of the side is more difficult; and to effect this many days are necessary. Where the bow and stern are to rise, the planks are lubricated with a certain composition, which gives them a tendency to curve upwards,...

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