The Prose Edda: Tales from Norse Mythology (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Courier Corporation, Mar 7, 2012 - Juvenile Fiction - 288 pages
149 Reviews
Gods and giants bestride these ancient tales, in which warrior queens and noble heroes battle with elves, dwarves, and fearsome monsters. Spanning the dawn of the world's creation to its fiery destruction, these gripping Norse legends chronicle the triumphs and tragedies of a lost era. Resounding with a poetic instinct for the picturesque, the dramatic, and the human, they form vivid portraits of the characters' personalities. They also depict the comic and disastrous results of ambition, passion, and destiny.
The wellspring of modern knowledge of Norse mythology, these sagas preserved the Vikings' narrative style from an invading European influence. Iceland's great literary genius, Snorri Sturluson (1179–1241), combined oral traditions, genealogical records, and old songs to immortalize his country's glorious past. Edda means "poetic art," and Sturluson's guidebook for Icelandic poets has been a timeless inspiration for generations of writers around the world, including Wagner, Borges, and Tolkien.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
42
4 stars
71
3 stars
28
2 stars
8
1 star
0

Hilarious & informative overview of Viking mythology. - Goodreads
An excellent intro to Norse mythology. - Goodreads
The Prose Edda is no exception. - Goodreads

Review: The Prose Edda

User Review  - Victoria - Goodreads

I gave it a 4 because having been written just a century after the close of the Viking Age, it can't help but be a little difficult to read despite the fact that Jesse Byock does an excellent job with ... Read full review

Review: The Prose Edda

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

The Norse had quite a taking to demonstrations of courage and valor, but also of wit, trickery, and a wicked sense of humor. These myths display the values for courage in battle (warriors who die in ... Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2012)

Snorri Sturluson's fame as a historian---his main work is the 16 sagas included in Heimskringla (c.1230), a monumental history of Norway from its beginning until 1177---lies both in his critical approach to sources and in his fine, realistic exposition of event and motivation. A similar combination of scholarly and imaginative talent is seen in The Prose Edda (c.1220). Intended to be a handbook in skaldic poetry, it preserves invaluable mythological tales that were on the verge of being forgotten even in Sturluson's time. A large part of what we know about Nordic mythology stems from his Edda. The bibliography that follows also lists the anonymous Egil's Saga (1200--30), which many expert Scandinavian medievalists (e.g., Sigurdur Nordal and Bjorn M. Olsen) attribute to Sturluson. It is a fascinating account of life in Norway, England, and Iceland and of the poet-warrior Egil, whose skaldic verse is renowned for its unusual emotional and personal qualities. Snorri Sturluson's own life was as eventful as those about whom he wrote. Returning to Iceland from exile in 1239, he again became deeply involved in serious power struggles and was murdered in 1241.

Bibliographic information