The miseries of human life; or The groans of Timothy Testy, and Samuel Sensitive [by J. Beresford].

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William Miller, Albemarle-Street, 1806 - English wit and humor - 361 pages
 

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Page 134 - Amor docuit natorum sanguine matrem commaculare manus ; crudelis tu quoque, mater : crudelis mater magis, an puer improbus ille? improbus ille puer; crudelis tu quoque, mater.
Page 325 - For death, the following day, in bloody fight : So scented the grim feature, and upturn'd His nostril wide into the murky air, Sagacious of his quarry from so far.
Page 111 - Miss in an old-fashioned riding-dress ; both figures partly colored and partly plain ; or a goggling wax queen, bolt upright in a deep glass case, among the minikin pillars of a tawdry temple, wreathed with red foil, tinsel, and green varnished leaves ; or the map of England, with only about four counties, and no towns in it, worked in a sampler by the landlady's youngest daughter,
Page 97 - In the pit, at the opera — turning briskly round, on hearing a box-door open close by you, in hopes of feasting your eyes on some young angel whom you expect to appear, and beholding, instead of her, that sort of hideous old crabbed-looking Crone of fashion, whose face is as tull of wrinkles, as her head is of diamonds.
Page 306 - ... 16. At a ball; — when you have set your heart on dancing with a particular favourite, — at the moment when you delightedly see him advancing towards you, being briskly accosted by a conceited simpleton at your elbow, whom you cannot endure, but who obtains (because you know not in what manner to refuse) ' the honour of your hand
Page 36 - While you are laughing, or talking wildly to yourself, in walking, suddenly seeing a person steal close by you, who, you are sure, must have heard it all ; then, in an agony of shame, making a wretched attempt to sing, in a voice as like your talk as possible, in hopes of making your hearer think that you had been only singing all the while. Tes. A forlorn hope, indeed !— if / had •been your hearer, I should have said, by way of relieving your embarrassment, " Si loqueris, cantas ; si cantas,...
Page 148 - A chaise window-glass, that will not be put down when it is np, nor up when it is down. Tearing your throat to rags in abortive efforts to call back a person who has just left you, and with whom you have forgotten to touch on one of the most important subjects which you met to discuss. After having left a company in which you have been galled by the raillery of some wag by profession, thinking, at your leisure, of a repartee, which, if discharged at the proper moment, would have blown him to atoms....
Page 133 - Beast is fairly slung in, and (after about a quarter of an hour consumed in the operation,) plunged down and bedded, with the squelch of a falling Ox, and the grunt of a Rhinoceros, — you find yourself suddenly viced in, from the shoulder to the hip ; upon which the Monster, — when, in another quarter of an hour, he has finally pumped, and panted, and snortled himself into tranquillity, —begins to make himself merry with your Misery, and keeps braying away, — totally callous to the dumb frowns,...
Page 57 - Go to the devil and shake yourself,' or any other such frolicsome tune, and the heart-sinking apprehensions under which you instantly tear down the dance, and keep rousing all the rest of the couples (who, having taken no ice, can afford to move with less spirit) — incessantly vociferating, as you ramp and gallop along, ' Hands across, sir, for heaven's sake.
Page 267 - Out, damned spot ! out, I say ! — One ; two : why, then 'tis time to do't. — Hell is murky ! — Fie, my lord, fie ! a soldier, and afeard ? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account ? — Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him ? Doct.

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