Falconry: Its Claims, History, and Practice

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Longman, Green, Longman, and Roberts, 1859 - Cormorants - 352 pages
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Contents

I
1
II
19
III
34
IV
50
V
68
VI
80
VII
96
VIII
107
XIII
178
XIV
192
XV
210
XVI
223
XVII
237
XVIII
256
XIX
271
XX
286

IX
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X
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XI
153
XII
161
XXI
327
XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
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Page 287 - to the leg of which the falconers usually tie a fox's brush—not only to impede its flight, but to make it, as they fancy, more attractive—is thrown up to draw down the kite." Poor Milvus probably considered, from his height, that there, near the earth, fluttered a bird that he could bully, slowly carrying off some heavy and valuable prey ; so
Page 31 - or Ripuarii, derived their name from their posts on the three rivers, the Khine, the Meuse, and the Moselle
Page 242 - at the same time calling to the hawk, she will come directly and pull it down. Let her eat the head and neck among the dogs as her reward. By following this method you will bring your hawk to be
Page 300 - pages on pages of recipes — very elaborate, very curious, and very incomprehensible. Take the following nice little remedy. I don't mean, swallow it yourself ; Heaven forbid ! but take it — it's a very easy way — as an example. In point of fact, " Take germander, pelamountain, basil, grummel-seed, and broom-flowers, of each half an ounce; hyssop, sassafras,
Page 44 - so called. Jack. The male merlin. Jerkin. The male of jer-falcons. Jesses. The leathern straps fastened to the legs of a hawk, and which are not removed when the bird flies. Leash. The leather thong fastened by a swivel to the jesses, when the hawk is confined to block or fist, &c. Mail, or
Page 153 - makes a tremendous ring, but still fails to get above him. Again and again they ring, and have attained a great height. A scream of delight is heard : ' They are above him ;
Page 43 - Check. To fly at ; to change the bird in pursuit. Clutching, Taking the quarry in the feet, instead of striking it down: Come-to. To begin obeying the falconer. Coping. Shortening the bill and talons of a hawk. Crabbing. Hawks fighting with one another.
Page 153 - A fine stoop, but the heron dodges out of the way. Now for ' Sultan ; ' but she misses too : the heron is up like a shot, and three or four rings have to be made before there is another stoop. Another and another stoop, with loud cheers from below. ' Sultan ' just catches him once, but can't hold : it seems still a •doubtful victory, when
Page 295 - but, if you use but one lure, take one of the birds from it to your hand with a piece of beef as soon as both bind.
Page 6 - few men exist who do not, so to speak, take off their hats mentally to so respectable an acquaintance. A friend of mine, it is true, once told me that his love for the sport of Falconry was perfectly independent of any feeling for antiquity and the middle ages, for which he cared nothing ; but I believe he was mistaken. If I could have twisted

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