A Theory of Semiotics

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Indiana University Press, 1976 - Literary Criticism - 354 pages
3 Reviews
..". the greatest contribution to [semiotics] since the pioneering work of C. S. Peirce and Charles Morris." -- Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism..". draws on philosophy, linguistics, sociology, anthropology and aesthetics and refers to a wide range of scholarship... raises many fascinating questions." -- Language in Society..". a major contribution to the field of semiotic studies." -- Robert Scholes, Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism..". the most significant text on the subject published in the English language that I know of." -- Arthur Asa Berger, Journal of CommunicationEco's treatment demonstrates his mastery of the field of semiotics. It focuses on the twin problems of the doctrine of signs -- communication and signification -- and offers a highly original theory of sign production, including a carefully wrought typology of signs and modes of production.

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Before there was linguistics, there was semiotics. Read full review

Contents

IntroductionToward a Logic of Culture
3
Signification and Communication
32
Theory of Codes
48
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About the author (1976)

Umberto Eco was born in Alessandria, Italy on January 5, 1932. He received a doctorate of philosophy from the University of Turin in 1954. His first book, Il Problema Estetico in San Tommaso, was an extension of his doctoral thesis on St. Thomas Aquinas and was published in 1956. His first novel, The Name of the Rose, was published in 1980 and won the Premio Strega and the Premio Anghiar awards in 1981. His other works include Foucault's Pendulum, The Island of the Day Before, and The Prague Cementary.

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