Ceramics, Cuisine and Culture: The archaeology and science of kitchen pottery in the ancient mediterranean world

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Michela Spataro, Alexandra Villing
Oxbow Books, Oct 31, 2015 - History - 304 pages
The 23 papers presented here are the product of the interdisciplinary exchange of ideas and approaches to the study of kitchen pottery between archaeologists, material scientists, historians and ethnoarchaeologists. They aim to set a vital but long-neglected category of evidence in its wider social, political and economic contexts. Structured around main themes concerning technical aspects of pottery production; cooking as socioeconomic practice; and changing tastes, culinary identities and cross-cultural encounters, a range of social economic and technological models are discussed on the basis of insights gained from the study of kitchen pottery production, use and evolution. Much discussion and work in the last decade has focussed on technical and social aspects of coarse ware and in particular kitchen ware. The chapters in this volume contribute to this debate, moving kitchen pottery beyond the Binfordian technomic category and embracing a wider view, linking processualism, ceramic-ecology, behavioral schools, and ethnoarchaeology to research on historical developments and cultural transformations covering a broad geographical area of the Mediterranean region and spanning a long chronological sequence.
 

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Contents

1 Investigating ceramics cuisine and culture past present and future
1
technical choices between tradition and innovation
27
kitchen wares in the Berbati valley Greece
28
tradition and innovation in Bronze Age cooking pots from Akrotiri Thera
37
computer models and simulations of heat transfer
49
5 A contextual ethnography of cooking vessel production at P̣rtol Mallorca Balearic islands
55
an important centre of production of cooking pottery from the prehistoric to the historic era
65
artefact variability technological choiceand practice
91
cooking stands as evidence for change
157
a cultural and social marker of Romanised society?
170
III New pots new recipes? Changing tastes culinary identities and crosscultural encounters
179
16 The Athenian kitchen from the Early Iron Age to the Hellenistic period
180
17 Mediterraneantype cooking ware in indigenous contexts during the Iron Age in southern Gaul6th3rd centuries BC
190
18 Forms of adoption adaptation and resistance in the cooking ware repertoire of Lucania South Italy8th3rd centuries BC
203
cuisine in Roman Tuscany the example of Il Monte
213
the Castro do Vieito case study
222

understanding cooking as socioeconomic practice
103
9 From cooking pots to cuisine Limitations and perspectives of a ceramicbased approach
104
an experimental approachto understanding the possibilities and probabilities of using ancient cooking pots
115
the use of chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques forreconstructing the role of kitchen and other domestic vessels in Roman antiquity
125
12 Cooking pots in ancient and Late Antique cookbooks
141
first steps towards the correlation of the evidence for food preparationand consumption in ancient Laconia
148
a diachronic perspective
233
diachronic and social perspectives
242
Looking beyond antiquity
251
23 Aegean cooking pots in the modern era 17001950
252
Index
269
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About the author (2015)

Dr. Michela Spataro is the scientist for ceramics and stone in the British Museum s Department of Conservation and Scientific Research. Dr Alexandra Villing is a classical archaeologist and curator at the British Museum s Department of Ancient Greece and Rome, with special responsibility for Greek pottery and the Archaic and Classical Greek world.

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