The Squatter and the Don: A Novel Descriptive of Contemporary Occurrences in California

Front Cover
S. Carson & Company, 1885 - American fiction - 421 pages
"Problems of the land, squatter, and railroad interests in Alameda County, San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego"--Baird & Greenwood.
 

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Contents

I
5
II
15
IV
25
V
34
VI
48
VII
60
VIII
71
IX
80
XXI
201
XXII
212
XXIII
221
XXIV
232
XXV
241
XXVI
250
XXVII
262
XXVIII
273

X
89
XI
99
XII
111
XIII
121
XIV
129
XV
139
XVI
148
XVII
154
XVIII
166
XIX
179
XX
189
XXIX
285
XXX
296
XXXI
307
XXXII
320
XXXIII
330
XXXIV
341
XXXV
353
XXXVI
366
XXXVII
380
XXXVIII
397

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Popular passages

Page 48 - The one great principle of the English law is to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings. Viewed by this light it becomes a coherent scheme and not the monstrous maze the laity are apt to think it.
Page 202 - Universe, and will also work there, for good or for evil, openly or secretly, throughout all time. But the life of every man is as the wellspring of a stream, whose small beginnings are indeed plain to all, but whose ulterior course and destination, as it winds through the expanses of infinite years, only the Omniscient can discern.
Page 353 - It was not Bonaparte's fault. He did all that in him lay to live and thrive without moral principle. It was the nature of things, the eternal law of man and of the world which baulked and ruined him ; and the result, in a million experiments, will be the same. Every experiment, by multitudes or by individuals, that has a sensual and selfish aim,' will fail. The pacific Fourier will be as inefficient as the pernicious Napoleon.
Page 48 - Board, as well as the courts, were to be governed by the treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the law of nations, the laws, usages and customs of the government from which the claim was derived...
Page 106 - You know that I have loved you from the first moment I saw you; when I lifted you in my arms.
Page 276 - I think the best thing for you to do is to go to bed. Tomorrow your father will see Clarence. That is George's advice, and I think it is good...
Page 203 - An act to aid in the construction of a railroad and telegraph line from the Missouri river to the Pacific Ocean, and to secure to the government the use of the same for postal, military, and other purposes, approved July first, eighteen hundred and sixty-two,' approved July second, eighteen hundred and sixty-four.
Page 160 - It ought to have been sufficient that by the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo . . . the nation's honor was pledged to respect our property. The treaty said that our rights would be the same as those enjoyed by all other American citizens. The [government] never thought of that. With very unbecoming haste, Congress hurried to pass laws to legalize their despoliation of the conquered Californians, forgetting the nation's pledge to protect us
Page 215 - Central Pacific Railroad Company." (209) Conflating the contemporaneous plights of the South and Mexican California, a Californio supporter and lobbyist in Washington DC concludes: There never can be any better argument in favor of the Texas Pacific than are now plain to everybody. So, then, if in the face of all these powerful considerations Congress turns its back and will not hear the wail of the prostrate South, or the impassionate appeals of California, now, now, when there is not one solitary...
Page 53 - When the suspicious squatters jocosely announce that they "don't want any cattle" because they "ain't no 'vaquero to go 'busquering [searching] around and lassoing cattle" (94), the Don's tone becomes desperate. "All I want to do is to save the few cattle I have left. I am willing to quit-claim to you the land you have taken, and give you cattle to begin the stock business, and all I ask you in return is to put a fence around whatever land you wish to cultivate, so that my cattle cannot go in there

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