The Legendary Cabinet: A Collection of British National Ballads, Ancient and Modern

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W. Joy, 1829 - Ballads, English - 436 pages
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Page 341 - A wretch forlorn," she cried ; " Whose feet unhallowed thus intrude Where heaven and you reside : "But let a maid thy pity share, Whom love has taught to stray ; Who seeks for rest, but finds despair Companion of her way.
Page 221 - Which from our pretty lambs we pull; Fair lined slippers for the cold, With buckles of the purest gold; A belt of straw and ivy buds, With coral clasps and amber studs: And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me, and be my Love.
Page 343 - Twas Edwin's self that pressed ! "Turn, Angelina, ever- dear. My charmer, turn to see Thy own, thy long-lost Edwin here, Restored to love and thee. "Thus let me hold thee to my heart; And every care resign : And shall we never, never part, My life — my all that's mine ? " No, never from this hour to part, We'll live and love so true, The sigh that rends thy constant heart Shall break thy Edwin's too.
Page 10 - Percy present word He would prevent his sport. The English earl, not fearing that, Did to the woods resort, With fifteen hundred bowmen bold, All chosen men of might, Who knew full well in time of need To aim their shafts aright.
Page 13 - Then Douglas swore a solemn oath, And thus in rage did say — " Ere thus I will out-braved be, One of us two shall die : I know thee well, an earl thou art, Lord Percy, so am I. But trust me, Percy, pity it were, And great offence to kill Any of these our guiltless men, For they have done no ill. Let you and me the battle try, And set our men aside.
Page 358 - John. It is the curse of kings, to be attended By slaves, that take their humours for a warrant To break within the bloody house of life ; And, on the winking of authority, To understand a law ; to know the meaning Of dangerous majesty, when, perchance, it frowns More upon humour, than advis'd respect.
Page 402 - And he fixed his eye on the darker speck. He felt the cheering power of Spring; It made him whistle, it made him sing; His heart was mirthful to excess, But the rover's mirth was wickedness. His eye was on the Inchcape float; Quoth he, " My men, put out the boat, And row me to the Inchcape rock, And I'll plague the abbot of Aberbrothok.
Page 338 - Forbear, my son," the Hermit cries, "To tempt the dangerous gloom; For yonder faithless phantom flies To lure thee to thy doom. "Here to the houseless child of want My door is open still; And, though my portion is but scant, I give it with good will.
Page 14 - I'll fight with heart and hand.' Our English archers bent their bows, Their hearts were good and true ; At the first flight of arrows sent Full fourscore Scots they slew.
Page 357 - I'll forgive your Highland chief, My daughter! — oh, my daughter!

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