Convicting the Innocent

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Harvard University Press, Aug 4, 2011 - Art - 376 pages
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DNA exonerations have shattered confidence in the criminal justice system by exposing how often we have convicted the innocent and let the guilty walk free. In this unsettling analysis, Garrett examines what went wrong in the cases of the first 250 people exonerated by DNA testing, and proposes systemic reforms.
 

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One continues to find references to this book being a study of Giotto, the early Renaissance artist.
"This probing analysis of three of Giotto’s major works and the patrons who commissioned them
goes beyond the clichés of Giotto as the founding figure of western painting. It traces the interactions between Franciscan friars and powerful bankers and illuminates the complex interactions between mercantile wealth and the iconography of poverty."
However, the book is about the impact of DNA testing and the willingness of courts to disregard the exculpatory evidence generated by such testing.
 

Contents

1 Introduction
1
2 Contaminated Confessions
14
3 Eyewitness Misidentifications
45
4 Flawed Forensics
84
5 Trial by Liar
118
6 Innocence on Trial
145
7 Judging Innocence
178
8 Exoneration
213
9 Reforming the Criminal Justice System
241
Appendix
277
Notes
291
Acknowledgments
351
Index
355
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About the author (2011)

Garrett Brandon L. :

Brandon L. Garrett is Professor of Law at the University of Virginia School of Law.

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