Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects (Google eBook)

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Open Court, Aug 21, 2013 - Philosophy - 505 pages
5 Reviews
Tool-Being offers a new assessment of Martin Heidegger's famous tool-analysis, and with it, an audacious reappraisal of Heidegger's legacy to twenty-first-century philosophy.

Every reader of Being and Time is familiar with the opposition between readiness-to-hand (Zuhandenheit) and presence-at-hand (Vorhandenheit), but commentators usually follow Heidegger's wishes in giving this distinction a limited scope, as if it applied only to tools in a narrow sense. Graham Harman contests Heidegger's own interpretation of tool-being, arguing that the opposition between tool and broken tool is not merely a provisional stage in his philosophy, but rather its living core. The extended concept of tool-being developed here leads us not to a theory of human practical activity but to an ontology of objects themselves.

Tool-Being urges a fresh and concrete research into the secret contours of objects. Written in a lively and colorful style, it will be of great interest to anyone intrigued by Heidegger and anyone open to new trends in present-day philosophy.
  

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Review: Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects

User Review  - Goodreads

This book was a joy and frustration to me. Harman starts with a rather large assertion that he is introducing an entirely 21st century approach to philosophy. In my anticipation of the "and your point ... Read full review

Review: Tool-Being: Heidegger and the Metaphysics of Objects

User Review  - Justin - Goodreads

Why do I find myself reading lots of stuff on Heidegger these days? Read full review

Contents

Dedication
Chapter OneThe Tooland
Chapter Two Between Being and Time
of Realism
Chapter Three Elements of an ObjectOriented Philosophy
22 Contributions
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About the author (2013)

Graham Harman teaches philosophy at American University in Cairo.

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