The book buyer, Volume 11

Front Cover
Charles Scribner's Sons, 1894 - American literature
0 Reviews

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 153 - Love had he found in huts where poor men lie; His daily teachers had been woods and rills, The silence that is in the starry sky, The sleep that is among the lonely hills.
Page 267 - Ships that pass in the night, and speak each other in passing, Only a signal shown and a distant voice in the darkness; So on the ocean of life we pass and speak one another, Only a look and a voice, then darkness again and a silence.
Page 153 - Folk say, a wizard to a northern king At Christmas-tide such wondrous things did show That through one window men beheld the spring, And through another saw the summer glow, And through a third the fruited vines a-row, While still, unheard, but in its wonted way, Piped the drear wind of that December day.
Page 291 - Ay, of all the artists living, loving, None but would forego his proper dowry, — Does he paint? he fain would write a poem, — Does he write ? he fain would paint a picture, Put to proof art alien to the artist's, Once, and only once, and for one only, So to be the man and leave the artist, Gain the man's joy, miss the artist's sorrow.
Page 38 - I knew a very wise man so much of Sir Chr — 's sentiment, that he believed if a man were permitted to make all the ballads, he need not care who should make the laws of a nation.
Page 758 - I went to school, but in your manner of the phrase had no education. When a little girl,. I had a friend who taught me Immortality; but venturing too near, himself, he never returned. Soon after my tutor died, and for several years my lexicon was my only companion.
Page 300 - I dimly guess what Time in mists confounds; Yet ever and anon a trumpet sounds From the hid battlements of Eternity, Those shaken mists a space unsettle, then Round the half-glimpsed turrets slowly wash again; But not ere him who summoneth I first have seen, enwound With glooming robes purpureal, cypress-crowned; His name I know, and what his trumpet saith.
Page 468 - A History of Our Own Times, from the Accession of Queen Victoria to the General Election of 1880. Four Vols. demy Svo, cloth extra, 12s. each. — Also a POPULAR EDITION, in Four Vols. crown 8vo, cloth extra, 6s. each. A Short History of Our Own Times.
Page 87 - So the struck eagle, stretched upon the plain, No more through rolling clouds to soar again, Viewed his own feather on the fatal dart, And winged the shaft that quivered in his heart ; Keen were his pangs, but keener far to feel He nursed the pinion which impelled the steel ; While the same plumage that had warmed his nest Drank the last life-drop of his bleeding breast.
Page 758 - I had a terror since September, I could tell to none; {/ and so I sing, as the boy does by the burying ground, •*because I am afraid.

Bibliographic information