Ecotoxicology: A Hierarchical Treatment

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CRC Press, Jan 12, 1996 - Science - 432 pages
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In Ecotoxicology: A Hierarchical Treatment, 20 recognized experts from around the world identify and present the fundamental concepts of ecotoxicology at the biological level central to their own research. Superbly organized, the book proceeds sequentially by chapter from the chemical to cellular to the ecosystem level, making it easy to read, understand, and use.
Specifically, each author identifies important hypotheses, paradigms, "false" paradigms, or new techniques in his or her research area. As a result, this book is a stimulating progressive treatment of ecotoxicology at all levels of organization. Each chapter draws mechanistic interpretation from the next lower level and attempts to predict effects at the next higher level. This innovative approach underscores ecotoxicology's potential for development into a new discipline and makes Ecotoxicology: A Hierarchical Treatment the definitive reference at this crucial juncture.
 

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Contents

Chapter
1
The Emergence of Ecotoxicology as a Science
7
Interactions Between Dissolved Trace Metals
20
FV Interactions Between Particulate Trace Metals
36
Ecotoxicological Considerations Metallothionein
43
Acknowledgments
49
Chapter 3
59
Complex Interactions
67
Population Density and Population Ecology
206
Evolutionary Analysis
213
References
219
Chapter 8
225
Conclusion
244
References
250
Untangling
255
Why and How?
264

Membranes in the Ecotoxicology Hierarchy
78
Chapter 4
85
Sediment Exposures
95
Food Web Transfer
103
Uses and Limits of Toxicokinetics
110
Utility and Assessment
116
Chapter 5
133
Molecular Markers to Toxicants
142
Genetic Ecotoxicology
154
Chapter 6
163
The Necessity of Quantitation
167
Methods for Quantifying Effects at the Cell and Tissue Levels
173
Effects of Low pH and Dissolved
181
Conclusion
189
Chapter 7
197
Discussion
285
Chapter 10
293
Ecosystem Stability
303
Species Redundancies
310
Acknowledgments
316
Competition for Resources
331
Conclusions
337
Chapter 12
347
Linking Ecology and Ecotoxicology
354
Slaying Some Myths
362
References
367
The Conceptual Basis for Evaluating Indicators
373
Acknowledgments
393
Chapter 14
399
Copyright

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About the author (1996)

The College of William and Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science

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