An Examination of Sir William Hamilton's Philosophy: And of the Principal Philosophical Questions Discussed in His Writings, Volume 1

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W.V. Spencer, 1867 - Philosophy
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Page 124 - ... the highest human morality which we are capable of conceiving " does not sanction them ; convince me of it, and I will bear my fate as I may. But when I am told that I must believe this, and at the same time call this being by the names which express and affirm the highest human morality, I say in plain terms that I will not. Whatever power such a being may have over me, there is one thing which he shall not do : he shall not compel me to worship him. I will call no being good, who is not what...
Page 563 - For example, does it not require some pains and skill to form the general idea of a triangle (which is yet none of the most abstract comprehensive and difficult) for it must be neither oblique nor rectangle, neither equilateral, equicrural, nor scalenon, but all and none of these at once.
Page 369 - Likewise the idea of man that I frame to myself must be either of a white, or a black, or a tawny, a straight, or a crooked, a tall, or a low, or a middle-sized man.
Page 527 - never, perhaps, been adequately expressed ;" and he proposes the following expression for it : " Neither more " nor more onerous causes are to be assumed, than are " necessary to account for the phenomena.
Page 368 - Again, the mind having observed that in the particular extensions perceived by sense there is something common and alike in all, and some other things peculiar, as this or that figure or magnitude, which distinguish them one from another; it considers apart or singles out by itself that which is common, making thereof a most abstract idea of extension, which is neither line, surface, nor solid, nor has any figure or magnitude, but is an idea entirely prescinded from all these.
Page 109 - By the Infinite is meant that which is free from all possible limitation ; that than which a greater is inconceivable ; and which consequently can receive no additional attribute or mode of existence which it had not from all eternity.
Page 73 - That the sphere of our belief is much more extensive than the sphere of our knowledge ; and, therefore, when I deny that the Infinite can by us be known, I am far from denying that by us it is, must, and ought to be believed.
Page 369 - I find indeed I have a faculty of imagining, or representing to myself, the ideas of those particular things I have perceived, and of variously compounding and dividing them. I can imagine a man with two heads, or the upper parts of a man joined to the body of a horse. I can consider the hand, the eye, the nose, each by itself abstracted or separated from the rest of the body. But then whatever hand or eye I imagine, it must have some particular shape and colour.
Page 51 - ... As the conditionally limited (which we may briefly call the Conditioned) is thus the only possible object of knowledge and of positive thought— thought necessarily supposes conditions. To think is to condition; and conditional limitation is the fundamental law of the possibility of thought. For, as the greyhound cannot outstrip his shadow, nor (by a more appropriate simile) the eagle outsoar the atmosphere in which he floats, and by which alone he is supported ; so the mind cannot transcend...
Page 17 - Of things absolutely or in themselves, be they external, be they internal, we know nothing, or know them only as incognisable ; and become aware of their incomprehensible existence only as this is indirectly and accidentally revealed to us, through certain qualities related to our faculties of knowledge, and which qualities, again, we cannot think as unconditioned, irrelative, existent in and of themselves. All that we know is therefore phenomenal— phenomenal of the unknown.

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