The Logistics of War..

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing
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Contents

I
6
II
27
III
46
IV
71
V
128
VI
168
VII
173
VIII
177
XIII
240
XIV
254
XV
304
XVI
310
XVII
312
XVIII
325
XIX
334
XX
359

IX
199
X
201
XI
205
XII
224
XXI
364
XXII
373
XXIII
379

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 116 - The science of planning and carrying out the movement and maintenance of forces. In its most comprehensive sense, those aspects of military operations which deal with: a.
Page 30 - I do not calculate upon the possibility of supplying the army with full rations from Grand Gulf. I know it will be impossible without constructing additional roads. What I do expect...
Page 38 - The art of war is simple enough. Find out where your enemy is. Get at him as soon as you can. Strike at him as hard as you can and as often as you can, and keep moving on.
Page 181 - You I propose to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their war resources. I do not propose to lay down for you a plan of campaign, but simply to lay down the work it is desirable to have done, and leave you free to execute it in your own way.
Page 101 - We must prepare to fight Germany by actually coming to grips with and defeating her ground forces and definitely breaking her will to combat...
Page 89 - The history of failure in war can almost be summed up in two words, too late. Too late in comprehending the deadly purpose of a potential enemy. Too late in realizing the mortal danger. Too late in preparedness. Too late in uniting all possible forces for resistance. Too late in standing with one's friends.
Page 56 - Advice to the several purchasing agencies of the government with regard to the prices to be paid; 5. The determination, wherever necessary, of priorities of production and of delivery and of the proportions of any given article to be made immediately accessible to the several purchasing agencies when the supply of that article is insufficient, either temporarily or permanently; 6.
Page 74 - May, 1944, to secure a lodgement on the Continent from which further offensive operations can be developed.
Page 249 - to sell, transfer title to, exchange, lease, lend, or otherwise dispose of ... any defense article ... to the Government of any country whose defense the President deems vital to the defense of the United States".
Page 103 - Strange as it may seem, the Air Force, except in the air, is the least mobile of all the services. A squadron can reach its destination in a few hours, but its establishments, depots, fuel, spare parts, and workshops take many weeks, and even months, to develop.

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