Communications: The Information Society

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DIANE Publishing
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Page 5 - They are available in several electronic formats to facilitate viewing on-line, transferring, downloading and printing. Comments are welcome at your local...
Page 5 - The journals — Economic Perspectives, Global Issues, Issues of Democracy, US Foreign Policy Agenda, and US Society and Values — provide analysis, commentary, and background information in their thematic areas.
Page 31 - The one country that can best lead the information revolution will be more powerful than any other. For the foreseeable future, that country is the United States.
Page 35 - the 21st century, not the twentieth, will turn out to be the period of America's greatest preeminence. Information is the new coin of the international realm, and the United States is better positioned than any other country to multiply the potency of its hard and soft power resources through information.
Page 31 - America has apparent strength in military power and economic production. Yet its more subtle comparative advantage is its ability to collect, process, act upon, and disseminate information, an edge that will almost certainly grow over the next decade
Page 5 - The opinions expressed in the journals do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the US government. The US Department of State assumes no responsibility for the content and continued accessibility of Internet sites linked to herein; such responsibility resides solely with the publishers of those sites.
Page 16 - ... in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first quarter of the twentieth century.
Page 31 - Dean of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University...
Page 25 - No, sir. The Americans have need of the telephone, but we do not. We have plenty of messenger boys.
Page 17 - As long as the centuries continue to unfold, the number of books will grow continually, and one can predict that a time will come when it will be almost as difficult to learn anything from books as from the direct study of the whole universe. It will be almost as convenient to search for some bit of truth concealed in nature as it will be to find it hidden away in an immense multitude of bound volumes.

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