Russia and the Russians; Or, A Journey to St. Petersburg and Moscow, Through Courland and Livonia: With Characteristic Sketches of the People

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E. L. Carey & A. Hart, 1836 - Russia - 194 pages
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Page 4 - I design to extract are his audita et visa, from the supplements to his chapters — that which he saw with his own eyes, and heard with his own ears...
Page 70 - ... round in emotion to the prince. Potemkin sank upon his knees, seized her hand, and wept. They were, perhaps, the first tears which those proud and stern eyes had ever shed. But now, all was accomplished: his destiny was fulfilled; he felt as if he had lived long enough. He left St. Petersburgh soon after, with a presentiment that he should never return. At the Congress of Yassy he was attacked with an epidemical fever ; and, on leaving that place, he alighted from his carriage in the middle of...
Page 88 - When no provision was made in the marriage contract, he says, they were accustomed to discipline their wives very severely. At the marriage the bridegroom had a whip in one boot, and a jewel in the other, and the poor girl tried her fortune by choosing. ' If she happens upon the jewel,' says another traveller, 'she is lucky; but if on the whip, she gets it.
Page 73 - ... side. To draw himself up into his original position ; to fasten the cord firmly round the globe ; and with the assistance of this auxiliary to climb to the summit — were now an easy part of his task ; and in a few minutes more Telouchkine stood by the side of the angel, and listened to the shout that burst like sudden thunder from the concourse below, yet came to his ear only like a faint and hollow murmur. The cord, which he had now an opportunity of fastening properly, enabled him to descend...
Page 73 - The angel, the object of his visit, was above this ball, and even concealed from his view by its smooth, round, and glittering expanse. Only fancy the wretch at that moment, turning up his grave eyes, and graver beard, to an obstacle that seemed to defy the daring and ingenuity of man ! But Telouchkine was not dismayed. He was prepared for the difficulty ; and the means by which he essayed to surmount it exhibited the same prodigious simplicity as the rest of the feat. Suspending himself in his stirrups,...
Page 71 - lofty, and light, and small," and is properly represented in the engraving as fading away almost into a point in the sky, is, in reality, terminated by a globe of considerable dimensions, on which an angel stands, supporting a large cross. This angel, less respected by the weather than perhaps his holy character deserved, fell into disrepair; and some suspicions were entertained that he designed re-visiting, uninvoked, the surface of the earth. The affair caused some uneasiness, and the government...
Page 60 - Chrism is an anointing with oil immediately after baptism, and is called " the seal of the gift of the Holy Ghost." The priest, in anointing the child, makes the sign of the cross on his forehead, eyes, nostrils, mouth, ears, breast, hands, and feet, saying each time, "the seal of the gift of the Holy Ghost.
Page 73 - Suspending himself in his stirrups, he girded the needle with a cord, the ends of which he fastened round his waist; and so supported, he leaned gradually back till the soles of his feet were planted against the spire. In this position he threw, by a strong effort, a coil of cord over the ball ; and so coolly and accurately was the aim taken, that at the first trial it fell in the required direction, and he saw the end hang down on the opposite side. To draw himself up into his original position...
Page 59 - happen to be in the same predicament, the matter must go before the Spiritual College." Many, it seems, thrust themselves into priestsi orders for no other reason than to revel and debauch with impunity ; and the bishop was especially desired to ascertain, before ordaining priests, that they were not superstitious, nor vagrants, nor hucksters of saints.* Further, " they are not only to observe whether priests and deacons, and the lower ecclesiastics, frequent the stews, or, being drunk, hollow in...
Page 72 - This man was a roofer of houses (a slater as he would be called in countries where slates were used,) and his speculations by degrees assumed a more practical character than the idle wonders and conjectures of the rest of the crowd. The spire was entirely covered with sheets of gilded copper, and presented a surface to the eye as smooth as if it had been one mass of burnished gold.

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