Little Susy's little servants, by her aunt Susan. by E. Prentiss

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1883
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Page 105 - How neat she spreads the wax! And labors hard to store it well With the sweet food she makes. In works of labor or of skill, I would be busy too; For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play, Let my first years be passed, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page 105 - In works of labour or of skill I would be busy too: For Satan finds some mischief still For idle hands to do. In books, or work, or healthful play Let my first years be past, That I may give for every day Some good account at last.
Page 111 - Oh ! that mine eye might closed be To what concerns me not to see ; That deafness might possess mine ear To what concerns me not to hear ; That Truth my tongue might always tie From ever speaking foolishly ; That no vain thought might ever rest Or be conceived in my breast ; That by each word and deed and thought, Glory may to my God be brought ! But what are wishes?
Page 101 - Susy into his lap, and showed her where to read. Susy read aloud : " I have this day been before God, and have given myself — all that I am and have — to God ; so that I am in no respect my own. I have no right to this body, or any of its members ; no right to this tongue, these hands, these feet, these eyes, these ears ; I have given myself clean away.
Page 6 - When first she was born, she did not know what they were for, or where they were. They did not know either, and so they were useless. Two of them were black, and so much alike, that you could not tell one from the other. Susy kept them almost always shut up, so that nobody could see them. When her aunts and cousins came to see Susy, they would say : ' I should think she might let us see them ! ' and would go away quite disappointed.
Page 110 - Then they knelt down together, and Susy's papa prayed to God to hear all they had been saying, and to be so good as to accept all Susy had now promised to give Him, and to keep her from ever forgetting her promise, but to make it her rule in all she said and all she did, all she saw and all she heard, to remember —
Page 111 - ... concerns me not to see ; That deafness might possess mine ear To what concerns me not to hear; That Truth my tongue might always tie From ever speaking foolishly; That no vain thought might ever rest Or be conceived in my breast; That by each word and deed and thought, Glory may to my God be brought!
Page 11 - I am afraid you will be much puzzled. So, if you will guess the names of these servants of Susy's, I will give you three guesses; and if you do not guess right the third time, you will have to peep into the glass, where you will see most of your own that I have talked about, QUESTIONS.
Page 5 - Little Susy had a kind mother to take care of her, so you will perhaps wonder why she had a great many servants of her own. I shall tell you of only a very few, and then you can ask your mother to talk to you about the others. For, the little servants Susy had, you have too. When first she was born, she did not know what they were for, or where they were. They did not know either, and so they were useless. Two of them were black, and so much alike, that you could not tell one from...
Page 111 - That deafness might possess mine ear, To what concerns me not to hear. That truth my tongue might ever tie From ever speaking foolishly ; That no vain thought might ever rest, Or be conceived in my breast. That by each word...

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