Neuromancer

Front Cover
Penguin, 2000 - Fiction - 276 pages
218 Reviews
Neuromancer is the multiple award-winning novel that launched the astonishing career of William Gibson. The first fully-realized glimpse of humankind's digital future, it is a shocking vision that has challenged our assumptions about our technology and ourselves, reinvented the way we speak and think, and forever altered the landscape of our imaginations.

Now, for the first time, Ace Books is proud to present this groundbreaking literary achievement in a trade paperback edition.

 

 

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4 stars
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3 stars
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2 stars
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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - bhabeck - LibraryThing

I didn't like this at all. The settings were hard to imagine and the writing seemed disjointed, making the story that much harder to read. It could be that I am just not good at imagining the world of ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - deldevries - LibraryThing

A classic, but a very strange book. I realize that this classic set the stage for many, many things which came later. But I felt that it was rather random, wandered, and lacked clarity. Read full review

All 73 reviews »

Contents

II
3
III
27
IV
41
V
43
VI
54
VII
69
VIII
78
IX
83
XVII
153
XVIII
159
XIX
169
XX
181
XXI
194
XXII
205
XXIII
216
XXIV
223

X
97
XI
99
XII
110
XIII
119
XIV
132
XV
145
XVI
151
XXV
233
XXVI
238
XXVII
246
XXVIII
255
XXIX
257
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About the author (2000)

William Gibson's first novel, Neuromancer, won the Hugo Award, the Philip K. Dick Memorial Award, and the Nebula Award in 1984. He is also the New York Times bestselling author of Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive, Burning Chrome, Virtual Light, Idoru, All Tomorrow's Parties, Pattern Recognition, Spook Country, Zero History, Distrust That Particular Flavor, and The Peripheral. He lives in Vancouver, British Columbia, with his wife.

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