Chiang Kai-shek's Secret Past: The Memoir of His Second Wife, Ch?en Chieh-ju

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Westview Press, 1993 - History - 273 pages
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In 1919, on the eve of the Nationalist Revolution, 32-year-old Chiang Kai-shek met a naive 13-year-old whom he proceeded to pursue relentlessly. Two years later, Chen Chieh-ju finally agreed to marry her brash and forceful suitor, beginning a seven-year marriage. Constantly at her husband's side, Che'en Chieh-ju became witness to Chiang's single-minded pursuit of power in the Kuomintang and the political infighting and intrigue that marked his struggle for leadership. In this book, Chieh-ju chronicles their years together, revealing the lustful, ill-tempered, quarrelsome, stubborn and boundlessly ambitious man behind the mask.
 

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Chiang Kai-shek's secret past: the memoir of his second wife, Chʻen Chieh-ju

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In his own time, Chiang Kai-shek had already become larger than life, yet he had another side that most people still do not know. He left his first wife to marry Ch'en Chieh-ju when she was 15 and ... Read full review

Contents

A Young Girl in Shanghai i
3
The Pursuit
9
Matchmaking and Courtship 2 s 4 Our Wedding 3 5
35
Honeymoon
43
The Dragons Pulse 5 8
58
Two Sons
65
Soochow
76
Canton and the General
86
Life at the Academy
166
The Chung shan Boat Incident
176
The Dinner Party
186
The Blue Shirts
198
Northern Expedition
203
Private Life
214
The Ordeal
220
Chiangs Father
231

Quarrels with Dr Sun
92
Rebellion and Reversal
107
Living Angel Liu
119
Soviet Friendship
127
The Whampoa Military Academy
139
Dr Suns Last Journey
147
Chiang Moves Ahead
153
The Great Intrigue
236
Nanking
244
My Exile
251
About the Book
265
Index
267
Copyright

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Page 128 - Dr. Sun Yat-sen holds that the Communistic order or even the Soviet system cannot actually be introduced into China, because there do not exist here the conditions for the successful establishment of either Communism or Sovietism. This view is entirely shared by Mr. Joffe, who is further of the opinion that China's paramount and most pressing problem is to achieve national unification and attain full national independence...
Page 128 - Dr Sun Yat-sen holds that the Communistic order or even the Soviet system cannot actually be introduced into China, because there do not exist here the conditions for the successful establishment of either Communism or Sovietism. This view is entirely shared by Mr Joffe, who is further of opinion that China's paramount and most pressing problem is to achieve national unification and attain full national independence, and regarding this great task, he has assured Dr Sun Yat-sen that China has the...
Page 10 - Sept. 3rd, 1859. Dear Bell : You can guess how I long to see you only by knowing how you wish to see me. I think of you all day and dream of you at night. I would gladly come home and stay with you always, but for that which brought me here — a desire to do something for others, and not to live wholly for my own happiness. I am at home, five miles north of Harper's Ferry, in an old house on the Kennedy farm, where we keep some of our things. Four of...
Page 104 - We are never more discontented with others than when we are discontented with ourselves. The consciousness of wrongdoing makes us irritable, and our heart in its cunning quarrels with what is outside it, in order that it may deafen the clamour within.
Page 112 - Buddha, and all the greatest sages, that " hatred does not cease by hatred at any time ; hatred ceases by love...
Page 135 - The sole aim of the Russian party is to make the Chinese Communist Party its legitimate heir,
Page 37 - ... altar and drank from a silver wine cup while the matron of honour chanted wishes that they might enjoy long life and harmony and have many children. Firecrackers were let off outside to end the ceremony. 'Whenever I looked up to steal a glance at Kai-shek,' Chen's memoirs record, 'I could see that he had a preoccupied and uncomfortable look about him, appearing to be happy and proud, but a little impatient. I knew instinctively his main thought was to get the ceremony over with.
Page 68 - I am exceedingly serry for you ; and if there is anything in the world I can do to help you, it shall be done. I know a very worthy widow-woman who lives in a small house in Park Street, Camden Town; and I happen to be aware that her lodgings are at this very moment to let. You would get two nice rooms for ten shillings а week ; and you may give me as a référence.
Page 253 - ... tickets for Jennie and two of the daughters of his patron, Zhang Jingjiang, to travel to the United States on the liner, the President Jackson. After Jennie reminded him of broken promises in the past, the general stood in front of a Buddhist shrine to swear to resume marital relations within five years. 'Should I break my promise and fail to take her back, may the Great Buddha smite me and my Nanking government,
Page 258 - I was surprised to learn that one of them went to America as my wife,' he added. Stepping up the hypocrisy, he claimed to have been 'courting Miss Soong all these many years without a thought of the political bearing of such a marriage and any suggestion in that direction is unfair to me and unjust to all the members of the Soong family.

About the author (1993)

Ch'en Chieh-ju was the wife of Chiang Kai-shek from 1921 to 1927. Lloyd E. Eastman was professor of history and Asian studies at the University of Illinois. Ch'en Chieh-ju was the wife of Chiang Kai-shek from 1921 to 1927. Lloyd E. Eastman was professor of history and Asian studies at the University of Illinois. Ch'en Chieh-ju was the wife of Chiang Kai-shek from 1921 to 1927. Lloyd E. Eastman was professor of history and Asian studies at the University of Illinois. Ch'en Chieh-ju was the wife of Chiang Kai-shek from 1921 to 1927. Lloyd E. Eastman was professor of history and Asian studies at the University of Illinois.

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