Growing Up Greenpoint: A Kid's Life in 1970s Brooklyn

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Burnt Jacket Publishing, May 22, 2018 - Biography & Autobiography - 320 pages
In Growing up Greenpoint, Tommy Carbone captures what it was like to be a kid during the 1970s and 80s in Brooklyn. This funny, and sometimes emotional, memoir follows the years Tommy was educated not only in the classrooms of St. Stan's, but on the streets of Greenpoint. It was there, playing street games with friends, being cornered by muggers, playing kissing games with the girls, spending time with family, and constantly seeking out the best snack foods in the neighborhood, where Tommy learned a lot about life; although he may not have known it at the time.A simple conversation, years later, about the New York City Blackout of 1977 sparks Tommy to recall his youth in the city he loved. His stories will bring you into the action of what it was like to dodge cars during a ballgame, to take a hike to another borough in search of a particular burger, to the hours spent playing pinball in a corner candy store, and how special it was to build traditions with three generations of Polish and Italian relatives in Brooklyn's garden spot.The vivid descriptions of his antics of what it was like to grow up during those years will transport you to the sounds and smells of living in the city during those trying years. Reading this book, you'll be entertained, and at the same time, you may shake your head wondering how Tommy ever survived - Growing up in Greenpoint.

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About the author (2018)

Tommy Carbone grew up in the Greenpoint section of Brooklyn. It wasn't until he was ten did he realize that Greenpoint wasn't the center of Brooklyn, much less the center of the universe, not everyone was good at pinball, and not all families ate pasta on Sunday nights. He now writes from a one room cabin on the shores of a lake that is frozen for more than six months out of the year and moose outnumber people three to one.

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