Jewelry and the Precious Stones: With a History, and Description from Models, of the Largest Individual Diamonds Known: Including, Particularly, a Consideration of the Koh-i-noor's Claim to Notoriety

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J. Penington & son, 1856 - Gems - 40 pages
 

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Page 13 - ... met in a room appointed for the purpose, and took their seats on the ground. A solemn silence then ensued, which continued unbroken for an hour. At length Runjeet's impatience overcame the suggestions of Asiatic decorum, and he whispered to an attendant to quicken the memory of the Shah. The exiled prince spoke not a word in reply, but gave a signal with his eyes to a eunuch in attendance ; who, retiring for a moment, returned with a small roll which he set down upon the carpet mid-way between...
Page 13 - There were also some strings of very large pearls, put on like cross belts, but loose. The crown was about nine inches high, not ornamented with jewels as European crowns are, but to appearance entirely formed of those precious materials. It seemed to be radiated like ancient crowns, and behind the rays appeared peaks of purple velvet: some small branches with pendants, seemed to project from the crown ; but the whole was so complicated, and so dazzling, that it was difficult to understand, and impossible...
Page 20 - Kabul, having been given to him, or more probably taken by him, from Shahrikh, the young son of Nadir. The jewel descended to the successors of Ahmed Shah, and when Mr. Elphinstone was at Peshawur, was worn by Shah Shuja on his arm. When Shah Shuja was driven from Kabul, he became the nominal guest and...
Page 13 - Abdallee chief to the ascendant dynasty of the Singhs. The two princes met in a room appointed for the purpose, and took their seats on the ground. A solemn silence then ensued, which continued unbroken for an hour. At length Runjeet's impatience overcame the suggestions of Asiatic decorum, and he whispered to an attendant to quicken the memory of the Shah. The exiled prince spoke not a word in reply, but gave a signal with his eyes to a eunuch in attendance, who, retiring for a moment, returned...
Page 31 - The opalus is a pretious stone which hath in it the bright fiery flame of a carbuncle, the pure refulgent purple of an amethyst, and a whole of the emerauld's spring glory or virescency, and every one of them shining with an incredible mixture and very much pleasure.
Page 18 - ... private persons of the first classes of the community. The company began to assemble in masquerade dresses at six in the evening. When the carriage of the Empress approached, meat, liquor, and clothes, were profusely distributed to the mob assembled at the outer doors, The Prince handed the Empress from her coach. He was dressed in a. scarlet coat, over which hung a long cloak of gold lace, ornamented with precious stones. He wore as many diamonds as a man can wear in his dress. His hat, in particular,...
Page 13 - Doorannee prince hesitated, prevaricated, temporized, and employed all the artifices of oriental diplomacy, but in vain. Runjeet redoubled the stringency of his measures, and at length, the 1st of June, 1813, was fixed as the day when the great diamond of the Moguls should be surrendered by the Abdallee chief to the ascendant dynasty of the Singhs. The two princes met in a room appointed for the purpose, and took their seats on the ground. A solemn silence then ensued, which continued unbroken for...
Page 13 - ... gold, and precious stones, over which were a large breast-plate of diamonds, shaped like two flattened fleur de lis, an ornament of the same kind on each thigh, large emerald bracelets on the arms (above the elbow), and many other jewels in different places. In one of the bracelets was the Cohi Noor, known to be one of the largest diamonds in the world *. There were also some strings of very large pearls, put on like cross belts, but loose.
Page 13 - The expression of his countenance was dignified and pleasing: his voice clear, and his address princely. We thought at first that he had on armour of jewels, but, on close inspection, we found this to be a mistake, and his real dress to consist of a green tunic, with large flowers in gold, and precious stones, over which were a large breast-plate of diamonds, shaped like two flattened...
Page 34 - ... it do at any time grow infirm or weak; and again upon the recovery of its master, that it doth recover its own lovely beauty which ariseth of the temperament of its own naturall heat, and becometh ceruleous like a serene heaven.

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