American Comic Annual, Volume 1

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Richardson, Lord and Holbrook, 1831 - Wit and humor
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Page 158 - Timmy was awake with the lark. Never before was there such a stir amongst the frogs of Lily Pond. But they were taken by surprise. With infinite difficulty he filled his bag, and departed on his journey. Mr. Buckram, the tailor, was an elderly gentleman, very nervous and very peevish. He was extremely nice in his dress, and prided himself on keeping his shop as neat as wax-work. In his manner he was grave and abrupt, and in countenance severe. I can see him now, handling his shears with all the solemnity...
Page 161 - Every nook and corner of the shop was occupied in an instant Such a spectacle was never seen before. The old man was nearly distracted. He rent his hair, and stamped in a paroxysm of rage. Then seizing a broom, he made vain endeavors to sweep them out at the door. But they were as contrary as hogs, and when he swept one way. they jumped another. He tried to catch them with his hands, but they were as slippery as eels, and passed through his fingers. It was enough to exhaust the patience of Job. The...
Page 156 - You boast of your bulk,' said he, straining up to his full height, and looking contemptuously around ; why, I am like a four-penny-bit among six cents — worth the whole of ye ! ' I shall now describe a melancholy joke, which they played off on the unfortunate shoemaker ; — I say melancholy, for so it proved to him. A fashionable tailor in a...
Page 159 - get out of my shop, you rascal ! " " I say you do want 'em," said Timmy, bristling up. "I know you want 'em; but you're playing offish like, to beat down the price. I won't take a mill less. Will you have them, or not, old man ? " " Scoundrel ! " shouted the enraged tailor, " get out of my shop this minute ! " Puzzled, mortified, and angry, Timmy slowly turned on his heel and withdrew. " He won't buy them," thought he, " for what they are worth, and as for taking nothing for them, I won't.
Page 158 - ... solemnity of a magistrate, with spectacles on nose, and prodigious ruffles puffing from his bosom. He was thus engaged one pleasant spring morning, when a short, stubbed fellow, with a bag on his shoulder, entered the shop. The old gentleman was absorbed in his employment, and did not notice his visitor. But his inattention was ascribed by Timmy to deafness, and he approached and applied his mouth to the tailor's ear, exclaiming— "I say, mister! do you want any frogs to-day?" The old gentleman...
Page 64 - Yet mark'd I where the bolt of Cupid fell: It fell upon a little western flower, Before milk-white, now purple with love's wound, And maidens call it Love-in-idleness.
Page 153 - In the spring it was a fashionable watering-place for bullfrogs, who gathered there from all parts, to spend the warm season. Many of these were of extraordinary size, and they drew near his shop, raised their heads, and swelled out their throats like bladders, until the welkin rung with their music. Timmy, engaged at his work, beat time for them with his hammer, and the hours passed away as pleasantly as the day is long. Timmy Drew was not one of those shoemakers that eternally stick to their bench...
Page 152 - Tall people are too apt to look down on those of less dimensions. Thus did the longlegged Yankees hector poor Timmy for not being a greater man. But, what our hero wanted in bulk, he made up in spirit. This is generally the case with small men. As for Timmy, he was "all pluck and gristle!

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