J. G. Herder on Social and Political Culture

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, 1969 - Philosophy - 329 pages
The texts collected in this volume, which was originally published in 1969, contain Herder's most original and stimulating ideas on politics, history and language. They had for the most part not been previously available in English. In his introduction, Professor Barnard analyses the basic premises of Herder's political thought against the background of the Enlightenment. He examines Herder's concepts of language, community and culture, his theory of historical interaction, and his approach to the problem of change and progress. Finally, he provides a brief comparative analysis of traditionalist thought following the French Revolution, showing how substantive writers like Burke differed from Herder despite the close similarity of political vocabulary.
 

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Contents

Herder and Politics
3
Language Culture and Community
17
Change and Progress
33
TRAVEL diary
63
Reflections on Myth Prejudice
71
Reflections on Social
86
ESSAY ON THE ORIGIN OF LANGUAGE
115
How man could and must have invented language
153
IDEAS FOR A PHILOSOPHY OF THE HISTORY
253
Man is organized for more complex sense perception
261
book v
272
The present state of man is probably the connecting
280
in What is climate? How does it affect mans mind
288
Concluding remarks about the conflict between
293
The practical understanding of man has always
302
BOOK IX
311

YET ANOTHER PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY
179
DISSERTATION ON THE RECIPROCAL INFLUENCE
225

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