Proceedings of the United States National Museum, Volume 18

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Smithsonian Institution Press, 1896 - Science
 

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Page 170 - ... We all know the nomenclature of botany to be an Augean stable, which C. Hoffmann, and even Gesner, were not able to cleanse. The task requires much reading, and extensive as well as various erudition ; nor is it to be given up to hasty or careless hands. You rush upon it, and overturn every thing.
Page 299 - Merrill1 sums up the results of his investigations as follows : "The points brought out in this paper and the suggestions advanced are (1) that a very considerable proportion of the mineral in the commercial use, and labeled as asbestos in mineral cabinets, is in reality anthophyllite, and (2) that the fibrous structure in this case and that of the true asbestos as well, is due, in many instances at least, to a process of shearing — is, in fact, an exaggerated form of the process of uralitization.
Page iii - Museum, the publication of which was commenced in 1875, consists of elaborate papers based upon the collections of the Museum, reports of expeditions, etc., while the Proceedings facilitate the prompt publication of freshly-acquired facts relating to biology, anthropology, and geology, descriptions of restricted groups of animals and plants, the discussion of particular questions relative to the synonymy of species, and the diaries of minor expeditions. Other papers, of more general popular interest,...
Page 16 - ... and about six whorls ; spire pointed, whorls rounded, somewhat constricted in front of the suture, which is appressed; sculpture of numerous flattened spiral threads, with about equal interspaces, uniform over the whole surface, but with occasional finer intercalary threads ; these are crossed by (on the last whorl about 13) rather stout, rounded ribs, strongest at the shoulder, obsolete beyond the periphery, and not reaching the suture behind them ; aperture rather long, outer lip simple, smooth,...
Page 20 - ... wrinkled, olivaceous epidermis over an earthy, concentrically, irregularly striated surface; beaks low, inconspicuous ; lunule and escutcheon somewhat impressed, but not limited by any distinct line ; valves elongated, recalling the shape of Modiola capax Conrad, in a general way ; the anterior side shorter and less high, the base impressed in the middle, more expanded in front and behind ; dorsal margin rather evenly arched ; both ends rounded ; internally dentition strong, like that of V ....
Page 8 - ... somewhat appressed ; aperture large, patulous, with the lips rather thickened. Long. of shell, 3; diameter, 1 mm. (Dall.) TYPE in ? Type locality, Cumshewa Inlet, British Columbia. RANGE. Forrester Island, Alaska, to Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Family ANAPLOCAMIDAE Genus ANAPLOCAMUS Dall, 1895 Shell short-spired, with a thick brown periostracum, with a simple, sharp, outer lip, parietal callus, arched pillar, the anterior extreme of the aperture slightly produced and pointed, as in some...
Page 361 - ... preceding tooth.' Inner suborbital tooth acute. Penultimate segment of abdomen of male (Plate XXV, Fig. 1) much constricted in its proximal half, widening at both extremities. Terminal segment obtuse, lateral margins convex proximally, slightly concave or straight distally. Appendages of first segment * (Plate XXVI, Fig. 1) reaching nearly to or beyond the extremity of the abdomen, near together for their proximal half, with only a slight outward curve; distal portions widely divergent except...
Page 19 - Zool, 43; pl. 18, figs. 12, 14. Shell large thin, earthy, white, compressed, with an olivaceous or yellowish, dehiscent epidermis, with concentric wrinkles and projecting laminae, which in the young are somewhat regularly spaced and distant, in the adult crowded and irregular; beaks small, low, not conspicuous, moderately inflated; valves evenly arcuate below, rounded at both extremities, the anterior shorter and less high than the posterior; lunule narrow, long, bounded by an incised line; ligament...
Page 375 - • shape in September, when they start on their great migration across the bays for the north shores, where they enter the creeks and estuaries and go upon the shoals, where they remain until grown, burying themselves in the mud and sand in winter.
Page 16 - Bulletin, Museum of Comparative Zoology, 43, No. 6; PI. 1, fig. 2. Shell fusiform, solid, whitish or pink, with a more or less olivaceous epidermis, and about six whorls ; spire pointed, whorls rounded, somewhat constricted in front of the suture, which is appressed ; sculpture of numerous flattened spiral threads, with about equal interspaces, uniform over the whole surface, but with occasional finer intercalary threads ; these are crossed by (on the last whorl about 13) rather stout, rounded ribs,...

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