Humanitarian Invasion: Global Development in Cold War Afghanistan

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Cambridge University Press, Jan 26, 2016 - History - 326 pages
Humanitarian Invasion is the first book of its kind: a ground-level inside account of what development and humanitarianism meant for Afghanistan, a country touched by international aid like no other. Relying on Soviet, Western, and NGO archives, interviews with Soviet advisers and NGO workers, and Afghan sources, Timothy Nunan forges a vivid account of the impact of development on a country on the front lines of the Cold War. Nunan argues that Afghanistan functioned as a laboratory for the future of the Third World nation-state. If, in the 1960s, Soviets, Americans, and Germans sought to make a territorial national economy for Afghanistan, later, under military occupation, Soviet nation-builders, French and Swedish humanitarians, and Pakistani-supported guerrillas fought a transnational civil war over Afghan statehood. Covering the entire period from the Cold War to Taliban rule, Humanitarian Invasion signals the beginning of a new stage in the writing of international history.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
In Search of Global History
8
Methodology
14
Afghanistans Developmental Moment?
46
States of Exception States of Humanity
119
From Pashtunwali to Communism?
150
Under a Red Veil 181 Afghan Feminisms
183
Borderscapes of Denial
209
The Little Platoons of Humanity
242
Conclusion
271
The Death and Life of Soviet Development
280
Bibliography
287
Index
317
Copyright

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About the author (2016)

Timothy Nunan is an Academy Scholar at the Harvard Academy for International and Area Studies. Previously, he was an Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the Zentralasien-Seminar of the Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

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