The South Pole: An Account of the Norwegian Antarctic Expedition in the Fram, 1910-1912

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Cooper Square Press, 2001 - Biography & Autobiography - 841 pages
2 Reviews
Roald Amundsen records his race to be the first man to reach the South Pole. Amundsen's expertise enabled him to succeed where his predecessors, and competitors, did not. His rival Captain Robert F. Scott not only failed to reach the Pole first, but--due to poor preparation and miscalculation--died with the rest of his party on their return trip. The South Pole remains one of the greatest and most important books on polar exploration.

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User Review  - auntmarge64 - LibraryThing

Without a doubt, Amundsen is a giant among polar explorers, having lead the first open-sea voyage of the Northwest Passage and, several years later, the first successful expedition to the South Pole ... Read full review

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User Review  - Miro - LibraryThing

It's interesting to compare this account with Apsley Cherry-Garrard's story of the Scott expedition. They were both racing for the south pole but Amundsen relied on very careful preparation and an ... Read full review

Contents

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS AND MAPS
ix
INTRODUCTION BY ROLAND HUNTFORD
xvii
FOREWORD BY FRIDTJOF NANSEN
xxvii
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Amundsen, a Norwegian polar explorer (1872-1928), was the first man to reach the South Pole. He was also the first to navigate the Northwest Passage, and later may have been the first to fly over the North Pole. While flying on a rescue mission in 1928, he was killed when his plane crashed into the Arctic Ocean.

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