The Suppressed History of the Administration of John Adams: From 1797 to 1801; as Printed and Suppressed in 1802

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Published for the editor, 1846 - United States - 392 pages
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Page 252 - an act to regulate trade and intercourse with the Indian tribes, and to preserve peace on the frontiers...
Page 219 - ... that he will support the Constitution of the United States, and that he doth absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to every foreign prince, potentate, state or sovereignty whatever, and particularly, by name, the prince, potentate, state or sovereignty whereof he was before a citizen or subject; which proceedings shall be recorded by the clerk of the court.
Page 379 - Reason first, you are a Virginian, and a Virginian ought to appear at the head of this business. Reason second, I am obnoxious, suspected, and unpopular. You are very much otherwise. Reason third, you can write ten times better than I can." "Well," said Jefferson, "if you are decided, I will do as well as I can.
Page 176 - Hidalgo, and the said article and the thirty-third article of the treaty of Amity, commerce, and navigation...
Page 123 - States respectively, or to the people," therefore also the same act of Congress passed on the 14th day of July, 1798, and entitled "An act in addition to the act entitled an act for the punishment of certain crimes against the United States...
Page 253 - An act in addition to the act, entitled an act to prohibit the carrying on the slave trade from the United States to any foreign place or country...
Page 27 - The third advantage of the government the Fathers were designing was pointed out most elaborately by John Adams in the first volume of his Defence of the Constitutions of Government of the United States of America...
Page 83 - Such attempts ought to be repelled with a decision which shall convince France and the world that we are not a degraded people, humiliated under a colonial spirit of fear and sense of inferiority, fitted to be the miserable instruments of foreign influence, and regardless of national honor, character, and interest.
Page 34 - The zeal and ardor of the people, during the revolutionary war, supplying the place of government, commanded a degree of order, sufficient at least for the temporary preservation of society. The confederation, which was early felt to be necessary, was prepared from the models of the Batavian and Helvetic confederacies- — the only examples which remain, with any detail and precision in history, and certainly the only ones which the people at large had ever considered.
Page 313 - ... compel us to resort. While our vast extent of sea-coast, the commercial and agricultural habits of our people, the great capital they will continue to trust on the ocean, suggest the system of defence which will be most beneficial to ourselves, our distance from Europe, and our resources for maritime strength, will enable us to employ it with effect. Seasonable and systematic arrangements, so far as our resources will justify, for a navy adapted to defensive war, and which may in case of necessity,...

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