Wildmen, Wobblies & Whistle Punks: Stewart Holbrook's Lowbrow Northwest

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Oregon State University Press, Sep 1, 1992 - History - 313 pages
8 Reviews
Stewart Holbrook - high-school dropout, logger, journalist, storyteller, and historian - was one of the best-loved figures in the Pacific Northwest during the two decades preceding his death in 1964. This anthology collects two dozen of his best pieces about his adopted home, the Pacific Northwest. Holbrook believed in "lowbrow or non-stuffed shirt history." Holbrook's lowbrow Northwest ranges from British Columbia logging camps to Oregon ranches, and is peopled with fascinating characters like Liverpool Liz of the old Portland waterfront, the over-sexed prophet Joshua II of the Church of the Brides of Christ in Corvallis, and Arthur Boose, the last Wobbly paper boy. Here are stories of forgotten scandals and crimes, forest fires, floods, and other catastrophes, stories of workers, underdogs, scoundrels, dreamers, and fanatics, stories that bring the past to life.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - satyridae - LibraryThing

Unfairly forgotten primo Northwest writer who has an unsparing eye and a sensitive BS detector. Funny, exciting, poignant and highly recommended, especially if you live in the Pacific Northwest. Loggers and anarchists, murderers and crazies, all here, all beautifully explicated. Read full review

Review: Wildmen, Wobblies & Whistle Punks: Stewart Holbrook's Lowbrow Northwest

User Review  - Ben - Goodreads

This book was great! Holbrook captures 'slice of life' stories with great reverence towards the characters and places contained in them. This book almost feels like a PNW proto version of Howard Zinn ... Read full review

Contents

An Introduction to Stewart Holbrook
1
Death and Times of a Prophet
41
Daylight in the Swamp
61
Copyright

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