A History of Western Music

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Building on his monumental revision of the Seventh Edition, PeterBurkholder has refined an inspired narrative for a new generation ofstudents, placing people at the center of the story.The narrative of A History of Western Music naturally focuses on the musical works, styles, genres, and ideas that have proven most influential, enduring, and significant—but it also encompasses a wide range of music, from religious to secular, from serious to humorous, from art music to popular music, and from Europe to the Americas. With a six-part structure emphasizing the music's reception and continued influence, Burkholder's narrative establishes a social and historical context for each repertoire to reveal its legacy and its significance today.

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Who are we to review the Bible of western classical music history? I'll try.
What I do like: each edition gets slighly better at being more inclusive and more attuned to context.
What I don't like: Middles of chapters get bogged down in theory and analysis - this is really only going to be comprehensible to undergrads if they already have a theory class or two under their belt. Women, minorities, and popular musics don't make sense in the narrative (not that they shouldn't be there, of course) - they are poorly glued onto the edges rather than integrated into the narrative. The CD set doesn't always have the most representative pieces of the concepts being described - and many of the pieces discussed in depth in the book don't show up on the CD. Some canonical composers and pieces are mentioned and said to be great, but there's no explanation as to why - we just have to trust the authors. Most chapters begin with historical/contextual information, but many chapters fail to integrate this information into musical discussions.
By this point in musicology history, we really should have better social history/ "new musicology" textbooks.
Lastly - I don't recommend this for a gen ed music history. You'll end up being frustrated because of the constant problem of what to do with the theory/analysis sections. And you'll waste time searching your school's music library (if you have one) or YouTube for better and more complete musical examples.
 

Contents

PART ONE THE ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL WORLDS
3
Heritage
21
Divisions in the Church and Dialects of Chant 25 Timeline 29
38
Characteristics of Chant 52 Timeline 53 Genres and Forms of Chant 54
54
Song and Dance Music in the Middle Ages
68
Complaint
83
Polyphonic Conductus 101 Motet 102 English Polyphony 109
112
FourteenthCentury Music in Performance 138 Echoes of
142
The Public Concert 472 Musical
482
Italian Comic Opera 484 Timeline 485 Opera Seria 489 Opera in Other
505
Orchestral Music 520 The Singing Instrument
525
Joseph Haydn 527 Timeline 527 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 546 Classic
565
Opera and Musical Theater in the Later Nineteenth
566
Revolution War and Music 17891815 568 Timeline 570 Ludwig
593
Orchestral Chamber
633
Orchestral Music 634 Timeline 634 Chamber Music 648 Choral Music 652
652

Music Printing 164 The Legacy of the Renaissance
166
Masses
190
Political Change and Consolidation 191 Ockeghem and Busnoys 193 The Next
209
Sacred Music in the Era of the Reformation
211
Germany and Eastern Europe 236 Jewish Music 238 The Legacy of Sixteenth
239
The First Market for Music 240 Spain 242 Italy 243 Timeline 244
263
Social
285
France England Spain and the New World in the Seventeenth
286
Innovations
306
The Operatic
328
Italian Vocal Chamber Music 329 Catholic Sacred Music 334 Timeline 335
335
Lutheran Church Music 339 Jewish Music 344 Instrumental Music 344
344
Tradition and Innovation
353
Style and National Traditions
382
Sonata Symphony and Concerto
412
PART FOUR THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY
413
Europe in a Century of Change 414 Music in Italy 417 Timeline 417 Music
427
JeanPhilippe Rameau 430 A Volatile Public
435
Musical Taste and Style in the Enlightenment
468
Romanticism and the Classical Tradition
659
The Roles of Opera 661 Italy 664 Timeline 670 France 673 Germany 677
677
The United States 681 Opera as High Culture
684
Technology Politics and the Arts 685 Opera 689 Richard Wagner 690 Music
702
Music for the Stage and Its Audiences
722
Dichotomies and Disputes 724 Timeline 725 Johannes Brahms 728
748
PART SIX THE TWENTIETH CENTURY AND AFTER
771
Modernism and the Classical Tradition
810
Expressionism 818
818
Alban Berg 823 Anton Webern 826 Igor Stravinsky 829 Béla Bartók 839
839
Charles Ives 846 Composer and Audience
854
Between the Wars 855 Timeline 856 American Musical Theater and Popular
876
The Classical Tradition
877
The Soviet Union 888 The Americas 892 The United States 894 What
905
Beethoven
955
GLOSSARY
A-1
FOR FURTHER READING
A-22
INDEX
A-87

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About the author (2010)

J. Peter Burkholder is Distinguished Professor of Musicology at Indiana University. He has written and edited four books on Charles Ives, as well as numerous articles on topics spanning from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century for The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Journal of Musicology, Musical Quarterly, 19th-Century Music, Music Theory Spectrum, and other journals. He has served as President, Vice President, and Director-at-Large of the American Musicological Society and on the board of the College Music Society. His writings have received awards from the American Musicological Society, the Society for American Music, and ASCAP.

Donald Jay Grout, late professor of music at Cornell University, also wrote a standard history of opera.

Claude V. Palisca, late professor of music at Yale University, began his collaboration on A History of Western Music with the Third Edition. Among his many publications are a history of Baroque music and a collection of scholarly essays on Italian Renaissance music.

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