Curtis's Botanical Magazine, Or, Flower-garden Displayed: In which the Most Ornamental Foreign Plants, Cultivated in the Open Ground, the Green-house, and the Stove, are Accurately Represented in Their Natural Colours ..., Volumes 21-22

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s.n., 1805 - Botany
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Page 871 - It is a native of the Cape of Good Hope, from whence it was brought to Holland, and in 1692 it was cultivated at Hampton court. This plant is propagated by offsets, taken at the latter end of June, planted in separate pots, with light kitchen-garden earth, and placed in a shady situation.
Page 826 - Country, but fraall and very thin of pulp. Requires to be preferved in the ftove through the winter, but in the middle of fummer is the better for being expofed to the open air. Flowers in the winter and alfo in June and July, at which time we received the plant from which our drawing was taken from Mr.
Page 886 - ... from Cornus suecica, by the leaves all growing in a whirl at the top of the stem, for the opposite pair about the middle are mere stipules ; Pallas doubts if they are not both varieties, and says the specimens he has seen from Kamschatka and Bering's Island, exactly correspond with garden specimens from this country and native ones from Canada, but it is not very improbable that Cornus Canadensis may be found in these places as well as Cornus suecica; we have specimens of both from Labrador....
Page 810 - IN, but his defcription is too fhort to determine. Is a native of the Weft-Indies, requiring the heat of a ftove. Our drawing was taken in the garden of Jos. WALKER, Efq. of Stockwell, in September laft.
Page 795 - ... fcales of the calyx, which are not fpreading, and the deeper incifions of the petals, (in collinus there is one deep incifion in the middle of the petal and feveral fmaller ones on the...
Page 809 - ... divided to the bottom into five ovate flefliy fegments, four of which are furnifhed each with two oval gibbous green glands nearly as long as the calyx. Petals five : claws long and (lender : lamina: roundifii, jagged at the edges, fomewhat fagittate at the bafe.
Page 886 - ... country and native ones from Canada, but it is not very improbable that Cornus Canadensis may be found in these places as well as Cornus suecica; we have specimens of both from Labrador. The other distinction which Willdenow observes of the leaves in one being nervosa, in the other venosa, remarked also by Mr. Salisbury, in Smith's Flora Britannica, though not unfounded, is hardly sufficiently pointed for use, as the nerves in suecica sometimes take their origin from the midrib, and the veins...
Page 796 - PUWHEIXA (Schrad.) R. Brown. Stem shrubby, erect. Leaves alternate, filiform, twice or three times Irregularly pinnate; leaflets unequal, divaricate when full grown and not unaptly resembling the antlers of a reindeer, whence It has been known by the name rangiferina among cultivators. Flowers white, collected into an oblong-ovate cone, terminal. Bracts obcordate acuminate, quite entire, imbricate, one to each corolla. Corolla 4-petaled; petals equal, adhering half way...
Page 886 - ... reasonable to consider that the Glacier plants represent perfect transitional types in every detail from the two supposed species, and verify the wisdom of the observation made in the "Botanical Magazine," No. 280, that Cornus Canadensis "is for the most part readily distinguished from Cornus suecica, by the leaves all growing in a whirl at the top of the stem, for the opposite pair about the middle are mere stipules ; Pallas doubts if they are not both varieties, and says the specimens he has...
Page 807 - LODDICES, of Hackney, for the living plant, from which our drawing was made, of this rare fpecies of Silene, hitherto known to modern Botanifts only by the defcription and figure of it by the learned prefident of the Linncan Society, as above quoted.

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