How to Think Like Leonardo Da Vinci

Front Cover
Thorsons, 2004 - Creation (Literary, artistic, etc.) - 318 pages
9 Reviews
This book shows you how to imitate Leonardo Da Vinci's thought processes and so enhance your aptitude in every area of your life. Learn how to fulfill your true potential by developing the thought processes used by Renaissance master Leonardo Da Vinci. Simply by imitating his insatiable quest for information and experience, we can all enhance our own aptitude in all facets of our lives. Michael Gelb discusses the seven fundamental elements of Da Vinci's thought process and offers practical ways to incorporate them into our own lives. The techniques outlined in the book help readers to develop the same traits of whole-brain thinking, creative problem solving and continuous learning, all of which are vital in today's world.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AliceAnna - LibraryThing

Fascinating insight into the mind of a genius. I will need to take some time to do the exercises. I think I would benefit from about 90% of them. I only found a couple to be a bit off beat (even for me). Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - tlockney - LibraryThing

Ok, so most of the self-help, self-improvement books out there are complete bunk and just full of outrageously obvious or deluded truisms (or, not-so-truisms). But I've found Michael Gelb's writings ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Michael Gelb is an internationally renowned author, speaker and consultant who runs workshops, seminars and consultancy projects for companies and organisations such as BP, IBM, FBI and Microsoft. His bestselling books include Lessons from the Art of Juggling, Thinking for a Change, Samurai Chess and Body Learning. He has also written and read successful audio programmes such as Mindmapping: How to Liberate Your Natural Genius and Power Speaking.

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