Freud, Religion, and the Roaring Twenties: A Psychoanalytic Theory of Secularization in Three Novelists : Anderson, Hemingway, and Fitzgerald

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Rowman & Littlefield, 1990 - Religion - 243 pages
In this book, Henry Idema has developed a theory of religion and culture indebted to the psychological work of Sigmund Freud and the sociological work of Weinstein and Platt, and he has shown the validity of his theory through illustrations from the life and times and work of Sherwood Anderson, Ernest Hemingway, and F.Scott Fitzgerald. Idema brings a psychoanalytic perspective to his analysis of religion and culture. He starts out by developing a theory of religion focusing on early relationships with the mother and father, and then shows how social forces such as urbanization, industrialization etc. weakened religion in the institutional church, especially in its function of helping men and women to cope with anxiety.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
A THEORY OF SECULARIZATION
7
SHERWOOD ANDERSON FROM RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS TO NEUROTIC SYMPTOMS
69
ERNEST HEMINGWAY FROM RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES TO THE PRIVATIZATION OF RELIGION
135
F SCOTT FITZGERALD FROM RELIGIOUS SYMBOLS TO SYMBOLS OF AFFLUENCE
179
CONCLUSION
223
BIBLIOGRAPHY
233
INDEX
237
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
243
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