The Earlier Tudors, 1485-1558

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Clarendon Press, 1952 - History - 699 pages
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This classic volume in the renowned Oxford History of England series examines the birth of a nation-state from the death throes of the Middle Ages in North-West Europe. John D. Mackie describes the establishment of a stable monarchy by the very competent Henry VII, examines the means employed by him, and considers how far his monarchy can be described as "new." He also discusses the machinery by which the royal power was exercised and traces the effect of the concentration of lay and eccleciastical authority in the person of Wolsey, whose soaring ambition helped make possible the Caesaro-Papalism of Henry VIII.
 

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Contents

THE NEW MONARCHY
1
Contemporaries unconscious of any remarkable chiuige
7
Decline of the nobility
13
the appearance of strength
19
THE FACE OF ENGLAND
25
John Lelaad
32
The contribution of the church to building
39
CHAFTKP IIL THE NEW KING AND HIS RIVALS
46
English thought in the main conservative
267
Triumphant Realpolitik
285
emphasis on authority
291
Woiseys foreign policy
305
Wolsey not altogether to blame for the failure of his policy
321
indicted for breach of praemunire 1529
329
ROYAL SUPREMACY
335
Divorce was the occasion not the cause of the Reformation
348

Henrys first parliament 7 November 1485
59
Henry friendly towards Scotland
76
Taxation for war
81
Statute of Fines
89
death of Northumberland
91
English invasion ill supported 1489
97
A new coalition against France 1490
103
Henry invades France and besieges Boulogne October 1499
109
attack on the Steelyard
124
Irish finances
131
Parliament of January 1497 votes money for the way
140
Surrender of Pcrkin October 1497 and capture of his wife
146
Henrys refusal of Mediterranean enterprises
156
The Spanish Marriage
172
England cultivates the Netherlands
181
Success of Henry foreign policy
188
Importance of the royal dignity
194
the lords 107
200
the yeomen and the guns
209
Death of Henry 21 April 1509
228
The young king
234
William Grocio and Thomas Linacre
241
Erasmus in England on the invitation of Mountjoy 14091500
249
His contribution to English humanism
257
England still supports the king
363
the Valor Ecclesiastiao
371
offers a double advantage
373
A new Act of Succession 1536
381
birth of Prince Edward 12 October 1537
394
The kings disposal of monastic wealth
400
royal absolutism
413
his achievement
442
urban tociety loses the old security
458
exports and imports
470
The government realist in its economic policy
477
Domestic attain factions and discontents
488
dearth amid plenty
503
The religious issue 308
509
Northumberlands bid for power
523
Arrest of Northumberland 21 July
529
Abortive rising of Sir Thomas Wyatt January 1554
538
17 November 1558
560
the English printers
580
persistence of the English tradition
588
Domestic furniture
597
a lusty people
604
INDEX
659
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