Lies of silence

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Arrow Books, 1991 - Fiction - 252 pages
17 Reviews

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Review: Lies Of Silence

User Review  - Robin - Goodreads

A gripping but poorly written book. The beginning of this novel is where all the action takes place, leaving the second half lacking, leading to a fairly predictable ending. My main issue was the one ... Read full review

Review: Lies Of Silence

User Review  - Matthew - Goodreads

This book was not actually short listed for the Booker. It was the only book by this author in my local bookstore. It is well written and I would, and probably will, read other books by this author. It was aa little too one dimensional for me. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
9
Section 3
40
Copyright

10 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

Brian Moore, 1921 - 1999 Brian Moore was born in Belfast on August 25, 1921 to Doctor James Bernard Moore and Eileen McFadden. He attended St. Malachy's College, a Catholic school, where the students where beaten on the hands daily. He left the college without a School Leaving Certificate because he failed Math. In 1941, a bomb damaged the family home, so they moved to a house on Camden Street. A year later, his father died. In 1942, he joined the National Fire Service, but knew that he wanted to be a writer. Moore knew some French, so he was hired by the British Ministry of War Transport to go as a port official to Algiers, North Africa. Afterwards, he traveled to Italy, France, and after the war, Warsaw (1945), Spain, Canada (1948), the United States and England, finally settling in California. Moore immigrated to Canada in 1948, where he worked as a proofreader and reporter for the Montreal Gazette. In 1951, he published his first story in the Northern Review and married Jacqueline Sirois, a fellow journalist. His only child, Michael, was born on November 24, 1953. He split with his wife in 1964 and then married Jean Denney, who he stayed married to until his death. Moore published "The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne" (1955), "The Feast of Lupercal" (1957) and "The Emperor of Ice Cream" (1966), which is his most autobiographical novel. He recounts his school experiences, as well as what is was like during the bombing. In the 1990's, he wrote political fables and four novels. "Lies of Silence" is a thriller set in Belfast and was a more political statement than the previous novels. It was nominated for the Booker Prize and was his best selling book. Several of his books were made into films such as "The Luck of Ginger Coffey," "Catholics," "The Lonely Passion of Judith Hearne" and "The Temptation of Eileen Hughes" was adapted for television. Moore received many awards, which included the Governor General's Award in 1961 for "The Luck of Ginger Coffey" and again in 1975 for "The Great Victorian Collection," which also won the James Tait Black Award in England. He was short listed for the Booker Prize in 1987 for "The Colour of Blood" and again in 1990 for "Lies of Silence." In July 1987, he conferred an honorary doctorate by Queen's University, Belfast. His film "Catholics" received the W.H. Smith Award in 1973 and the Peabody Award in 1974. In 1999, Brian Moore died at his home in Malibu, California.

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