Architects of the Culture of Death

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Ignatius Press, 2004 - Religion - 410 pages
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"The 'Culture of Death' has become a popular phrase, and is much bandied about in academic circles. Yet, for most people, its meaning remains vague and remote. DeMarco and Wiker have given the Culture of Death high definition and frightening immediacy. They have exposed its roots by introducing its architects. In a scholarly, yet reader-friendly delineation of the mindsets of twenty-three influential thinkers, such as Ayn Rand, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, Jean-Paul Sartre, Alfred Kinsey, Margaret Sanger, Jack Kevorkian, and Peter Singer, they make clear the aberrant thought and malevolent intentions that have shaped the Culture of Death. Still, this is not a book without hope. If the Culture of Death rests on a fragmented view of the person and an eclipse of God, hope for the Culture of Life rests on an understanding and restoration of the human being as a person, and the rediscovery of a benevolent God. The Personalism of John Paul II is an illuminating thread that runs through Architects, serving as a hopeful antidote." -- BOOK JACKET.
 

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The phrase, "the Culture of Death", is bandied about as a catch-all term that covers abortion, euthanasia and other attacks on the sanctity of life. In Architects of the Culture of Death, authors ... Read full review

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Contents

Arthur Schopenhauer
27
Friedrich Nietzsche
41
Ayn Rand
54
Charles Darwin
69
Francis Galton
87
Ernst Haeckel
104
Karl Marx
121
Auguste Comte
135
Wilhelm Reich
222
Helen Gurley Brown
234
Margaret Mead
249
Alfred Kinsey
266
Margaret Sanger
287
Clarence Gamble
303
Alan Guttmacher
317
Derek Humphry
335

Judith Jarvis Thomson
148
JeanPaul Sartre
163
Simone de Beauvoir
177
Elisabeth Badinter
191
Sigmund Freud
207
Jack Kevorkian
348
Peter Singer
361
Personalism and the Culture of Life
375
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