The Spook who Sat by the Door: A Novel

Front Cover
Wayne State University Press, 1990 - Fiction - 248 pages

A classic in the black literary tradition, The Spook Who Sat by the Door is both a comment on the civil rights problems in the United States in the late 60s and a serious attempt to focus on the issue of black militancy.

Dan Freeman, the "spook who sat by the door," is enlisted in the CIA's elitist espionage program. Upon mastering agency tactics, however, he drops out to train young Chicago blacks as "Freedom Fighters" in this explosive, award-winning novel.

As a story of one man's reaction to ruling-class hypocrisy, the book is autobiographical and personal. As a tale of a man's reaction to oppression, it is universal. A publication in the African American Life series.

 

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User Review  - magonistarevolt - LibraryThing

A blistering read. A black revolutionary joins the CIA and learns all about revolutions overseas, then quits and uses his knowledge to organize a street gang into a revolutionary cadre. When the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Stahl-Ricco - LibraryThing

An intense, gritty read! I liked the quote from Time on the back of the book, "Blends James Bond parody with wit and rage." That about sums it up! Dan Freeman is one cool cat! Go Cobras!!! Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
12
Section 3
28
Section 4
40
Section 5
49
Section 6
59
Section 7
66
Section 8
77
Section 10
105
Section 11
121
Section 12
134
Section 13
162
Section 14
173
Section 15
188
Section 16
200
Section 17
217

Section 9
89

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About the author (1990)

Sam Greenlee (1930-2014) was a highly acclaimed, internationally known poet, novelist, playwright, screenwriter, producer, director, actor, and teacher. A former U.S. Information Agency Foreign Service officer, he is the author of Baghdad Blues and three collections of poetry.

Bibliographic information