Scripting Intelligence: Web 3.0 Information Gathering and Processing

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Apress, Sep 1, 2009 - Computers - 392 pages
This book covers Web 3.0 technologies from a software developer’s point of view. While n- techies can use web services and portals that other people create, developers have the ability to be creators and consumers at the same time—by integrating their work with other people’s efforts. The Meaning of Web 3.0 Currently, there is no firm consensus on what “Web 3.0” means, so I feel free to define Web 3.0 for the context of this book and to cover Ruby technologies that I believe will help you develop Web 3.0 applications. I believe that Web 3.0 applications will be small, that they can be constructed from existing web applications, and that they can be used to build new web applications. Most Web 3.0 technologies will be important for both clients and services. Web 3.0 software systems will need to find and “understand” information, merge information from different sources, and offer flexibility in publishing information for both human re- ers and other software systems. Web 3.0 applications will also take advantage of new “cloud” computing architectures and rich-client platforms. Web 3.0 also means you can create more powerful applications for less money by using open source software, relying on public Linked Data sources, and taking advantage of thi- party “cloud” hosting services like Amazon EC2 and Google App Engine.
 

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Contents

Text Processing
2
CHAPTER
5
CHAPTER
7
CHAPTER
10
CHAPTER
12
CHAPTER
15
Natural Language Processing
35
Extracting Entities from Text
46
Information Gathering and Storage
152
Using Web Scraping to Create Semantic Relations
205
Using Watir to WebScrape CookingSpace com
213
Wrapup
228
INDEX
230
Using Linked Data Sources
235
Wrapup
246
Data Storage
247

Performing Entity Extraction Using Open Calais
52
Clustering Text Documents
58
Wrapup
65
The Semantic
66
Understanding RDFS
75
Exploring Logic and Inference
82
Wrapup
92
PART 5
104
Performing SPARQL Queries and Understanding
115
Wrapup
131
Information Publishing
268
MapReduce Functions
285
Wrapup
301
A Personal Interesting Things Web Application
309
Wrapup
333
Appendixes
334
Returning HTML or RDF Data Depending on HTTP Headers
342
Introducing RDFa
347
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Mark Watson is the author of 14 books on artificial intelligence, Java, C++, UML, and Linux. He is a consultant who uses Ruby, Java, and Common Lisp. He maintains a web site at markwatson.com.

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