The Waters of Kronos

Front Cover
Penn State Press, 1960 - Fiction - 175 pages
22 Reviews

From the time of its first publication in 1960, Conrad Richter's The Waters of Kronos sparked lively debate about the extent to which its story of a belated return to childhood scenes mirrored key events of Richter's own life. As was well known at the time, Richter had spent several years in the Southwest, where he collected the material for his first successful book, Early Americans and Other Stories, but by 1933, he had returned to live in his hometown, Pine Grove, Pennsylvania.

John Donner, the main protagonist in The Waters of Kronos, traces a similar route from west to east, although he finds that his family home and native town have been submerged under the deep waters of a lake formed by the construction of a hydroelectric dam. As Richter narrates his alter ego's efforts to salvage his past, he moves beyond "semi-autobiography" to offer what are widely recognized as his most haunting reflections upon the power of family history, the fragility of human memory, and art's role in structuring the communal ethos. David McCullough, a fellow Pulitzer Prize winner, met and befriended Richter in the 1960s and has called him "an American master," praising The Waters of Kronos as "his most beautiful book."

 

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Review: The Waters of Kronos

User Review  - Jim Jaqcobs - Goodreads

An author with a soul, one who writes with deep emotion and awareness of the human condition. David McCullough mentioned Richter in a NY Times book review article. I knew nothing of this author before ... Read full review

Review: The Waters of Kronos

User Review  - Goodreads

"If the young could only know," he apologized for his uncertainty. "But then they wouldn't be young anymore" Read full review

All 13 reviews »

Contents

CHAPTER ONE THE RIVER
3
CHAPTER TWO SILT
33
CHAPTER FOUR RUST
56
CHAPTER FIVE THE BREEDING MARSH
83
CHAPTER six THE CONFLUENCE
105
CHAPTER SEVEN THE SOURCE
124
CHAPTER EIGHT THE SEA
154
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About the author (1960)

Conrad Richter was born in Pine Grove, Pennsylvania on October 13, 1890. Richter started a small publishing business and wrote magazine fiction and nonfiction books on scientific philosophy. Conrad Richter won the Pulitzer Prize for his novel, "The Town," in 1951. The book was the third in what became known as Richter's Ohio Trilogy. These books were later published in one volume entitled, The Awakening Land: The Trees, The Fields, The Town. The books followed the life of Sayward Luckett Wheeler who was widely considered one of the most sensitively drawn pioneer women in fiction. The trilogy describes her participation in the gradual replacement of the gloomy and dangerous Ohio forest wilderness with new farming communities and a thriving town. Although Richter published more than 20 other novels and collections of short stories, most of which featured pioneers battling their environment, and some of which won their own awards, he is still best known for his Ohio Trilogy. Richter has written many other books including "Early Americana," a collection of short stories, "The Sea of Grass," a book about crooked politicians and cattlemen, and "The Light in the Forest," a book about the kidnapping of a white boy by Native Americans. He also won a National Book Award for "The Waters of Kronos" in 1961. "The Sea of Grass," was also nominated for the National Book Award in 1937. Conrad Richter died in Pottsville, Pennsylvania on October 30, 1968.

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