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Books Books 1 - 10 of 165 on the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things ; and the enlarging of the....
" the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things ; and the enlarging of the bounds of humane empire to the effecting of all things possible. "
Nature - Page 163
edited by - 1871
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The miscellaneous writings of Francis Bacon

Francis Bacon - 1802 - 260 pages
...study of the works and creatures erf God;" and in effecting the object of this new società, umidi is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things, and the enlarging ff the bounds of human empire to the accomplishment of ail kings poteilile, he giva afmished example...
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Sylva sylvarum (century IX-X) Physiological remains. Medical remains ...

Francis Bacon - Philosophy - 1819
...assigned. And, fourthly, the ordinances and rites which we observe. " THE end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things ; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible. some of them are digged and made under great...
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American Journal of Science, Volume 41

Science - 1841
...institution which he calls Solomon's House. Of this institution he says, " The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things, and the enlarging the bounds of the human empire to effecting of things possible." A strikingly beautiful parallel is...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Baron of Verulam, Viscount St. Alban and Lord ...

Francis Bacon - 1826
...assigned. And, fourthly, the ordinajico.s amijiíff e which we observe. " The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things ; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible. " We have burials in several earths, where we...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: A New Edition:

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1825
...fourthly, the ordinances and rites " which we observe. " THE end of our foundation is the know" ledge of causes, and secret motions of things; " and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, " to the effecting of all things possible. " The preparations and instruments are these....
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The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History, Volume 2

William Whewell - Science - 1840
...traveller, describes it by the name of Solomon's House; and says *, " The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things; and the enlarging the bounds of the human empire to effecting of things possible." And, as parts of this House, he describes...
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The Christian Remembrancer, Volume 6

Christianity - 1843
...both its credenda and its agenda; its researches are both luoifera and fructifera ; its end is both " the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things, and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire to the effecting of all thmgs possible." * The latter of these was a continual subject...
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The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences: Founded Upon Their History, Volume 2

William Whewell - Science - 1847
...inquiring traveller, describes it by the name of Solomon's House; and says*, " The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes and secret motions of things; and the enlarging the bounds of the human empire to effecting of things possible." And, as parts of this House, he describes...
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The Works of Francis Bacon, Lord Chancellor of England: With a ..., Volume 1

Francis Bacon, Basil Montagu - 1848
...assigned. And, fourthly, the ordinances and rites which we observe. 41 The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things ; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible. " The preparations and instruments are these....
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A History of the Royal Society: With Memoirs of the Presidents

Charles Richard Weld - London (England) - 1848
...distinctly set forth. Describing this imaginary establishment, he says, " The end of our foundation is the knowledge of causes, and secret motions of things; and the enlarging of the bounds of human empire, to the effecting of all things possible. The preparations and instruments are—large...
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